NVIDIA Tegra Tab 7 gets tested in benchmarks

August 12, 2013
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Late last week we learned that NVIDIA could be eying their next target. That being the tablet market with a new Tegra Tab 7 device in some trademark filings, which confirmed a 7-inch Tegra 4 quad-core powered Android tablet. Their first own branded NVIDIA SHIELD is already on the market, and now we're seeing our first benchmark results for the new Tab.

We don't know much at this point but it appears that NVIDIA will be entering the tablet market to take on Google's Nexus 7, ASUS, Samsung, and all the rest. The Tegra Tab (possibly named TegraNote) leaked last week. Being listed as the Tegra Tab-premium here suggests they might have multiple versions, if this leak is indeed even legit.

The popular AnTuTu benchmark was reportedly ran on the new NVIDIA tablet, spreading those Tegra 4 quad-core wings and letting it fly in some benchmark testing. However, the results are average at best (for a Tegra 4) even though they beat the old quad-core powered, and the new Nexus 7 both. The reason we're doubting this 27,000 score is because we've seen the Tegra 4 powered NVIDIA SHIELD do much, much better.

Tegra-Tab-7-Benchmarks

Above is the leaked result for the 7-inch 1280 x 720p Tegra Tab running a quad-core Tegra 4 at 1.8 GHz apparently scoring 27,643. However, our own NVIDIA SHIELD Review showed a far more impressive processor. Which has us doubting this leaks accuracy. The SHIELD with the same Tegra 4 (we're assuming) came in at 39,000 in AnTuTu. The highest of any device we've tested to date. It has a smaller 5-inch display, but comes in with the same 720p resolution.

For now we're not exactly sure what NVIDIA has planned, but with all their popular and quality THD TegraZone enhanced Android games a tablet specifically for those sure makes sense. More details on the Tegra Tab can be found from the original leak linked to below, and we have a feeling more details will be coming out quick.

VIA: Unwired View


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  • Scott Hendry

    how does that translate into how the tablet functions? i’m really starting to buy into this whole post-spec-wars thing. there’s always overclocking if you really just want to push hardware. all i care about is that my device responds to my commands, has a good battery, and does not have a fruit on the back.

  • NachoKingP

    You’re not taking into account that this is a tablet. The Shield (which I own and is incredibly amazing) has an active cooling system that ramps up when necessary. My thought is that they completely overclocked the Tegra 4 in the Shield, and that’s why you’re seeing such drastically different benchmark scores. I think the Tegra 4 isn’t nearly the jump in power that the Shield leads people to believe, but it was VERY deliberate strategy on Nvidia’s part to release the Shield as the world’s first Tegra 4 product.