Now that we’ve seen Blackberry begin to entertain buyout offers, the concern falls on other OEMs or service providers. The chart, which you see below, shows an alarming trend for HTC, which is currently struggling to regain traction they lost to Samsung and others the past few years. According to this data, HTC may be in an equally tenuous position to Blackberry.

While we all hope for an HTC resurgence, it may not happen. “I don’t see a comeback” David Chan, an analyst at Yuanta Securities in Taipei, told Bloomberg. He also fears HTC is “going down the route” of Nokia and BlackBerry, but thinks their current trading value is still too costly for a merger or buyout. Of 30 analysts tracked by Bloomberg, Chan is one of 24 urging investors to sell the stock. Five are advising investors to hold steady, and one holdout places a “buy” rating on the stock.

HTC value

HTC currently trades worldwide at about 1.4 times it’s net value, almost triple what BlackBerry was trading at when it accepted a buyout offer. As you can see in the lower portion of the graphic, HTC ranks lowest of the three, and a 1.6 out of a possible 5, which is the lowest of 500 tech companies in data compiled by Bloomberg.

Currently, HTC is vowing to make a triumphant comeback, despite seeing their global share cut in half this time versus last year. Once worth roughly $37 billion, HTC is now valued at around $3.8 billion. That’s a 90% loss in value for a company that has lost half of their market share in one year.