Google Glass has seen hard times lately. Between various talking heads positing the end of days for the wearable and more establishments banning it, Glass is gaining quite the reputation. In an attempt to quell fears and misunderstandings, the Glass team created a rather lengthy Google+ post about Glass.


In the post, Google goes over the top ten “myths” about Glass, ranging from facial recognition to always-on recording. They even went so far as to remind us that Glass is still a beta program, and not ready for the big leagues of retail. They also suggest Glass isn’t distracting, and caution establishments against banning it. As many “myths” as the post addresses, it asks as many questions in return.

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At least in a roundabout sort of way, five of the ten “myths” regard the camera on Glass. Google suggests the same privacy fears brought up with Glass have been posed when both regular cameras and cell phone cameras were introduced in their day. What they don’t address is that it’s pretty easy to tell when someone is pointing a device they’re holding up at you; it’s much harder to tell when you’re being video taped while someone looks in your general direction. In a more intimate setting — say a bar — it’s pretty clear when someone is taping you. In an open space? Not so much.

Google also makes an argument against Glass being for “technology-worshipping geeks”. They take the stance that people from all walks of life are using Glass, and finding it efficient and useful. That’s true, but there are also an incresing number of folks dropping Glass for their own reasons — and not just the noisy ones. It’s also a bit dismissive to think that a zookeeper or doctor can’t be a tech-obsessed nerd.

Bottom line: Google is unnerved. The fervent anti-Glass chatter is obviously bothering them. Between potential driving bans and ‘Glassholes’ getting much more attention than the respectful ones, Google has their hands full. We’re not sure posting something to the tech-centric Google+ crowd is really fixing the issues, though.