There are many reasons why people want to move to Canada. It’s such a nice and welcoming country. Sans the long cold winter season, we know a lot of people who would want to migrate there. And for those people who are particular with their gadgets and services they are paying, you’d find it interesting that a government agency has banned phone unlocking fees and locked devices in Canada.

The Canadian Radio‑television and Telecommunications (CRTC) recently announced that everyone in the country can have their phones unlocked for free. There will be no more unlocking fees and locked phones will no longer be allowed. All new phones that will be sold must be unlocked as well. Starting December 1, 2017, you can have your current phone unlocked at no extra cost.

The telecom regulator decided on this change after reviewing the Wireless Code and policies. Some people are demanding unlocking fees must be removed while others are saying such can deter theft. If not completely abolished, the fees must be set not higher than $50.

Another good thing shared by the CRTC is that returns can be made within 15 days and with less than half of the limit used. Trial period for new plans has been extended to 30 days for those with disabilities.

There are many other things CRTC has tackled including ways to fight against bill shock. The account holder must give the consent to data overage and the carrier must allow it. The agency also reminded the carriers that they cannot change the terms of a plan or service without the account owner’s consent during the contract period.

OpenMedia’s digital rights advocate Katy Anderson said:

“The changes made today will go a long way to ensuring Canadians know what their rights are when it comes to cell phone plans, and send a strong message to these companies that the CRTC intends to continue looking closely at the way they treat their customers.”

Indeed, these changes and reiterations of the Wireless Code of Conduct will bring quite an improvement to the way the carriers in Canada serve the mobile consumers.

VIA: Mobilesyrup