Verizon Disagrees With FCC’s Net Neutrality, FIles an appeal

January 21, 2011
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Verizon has made public of their opposing stance on the FCC's net neutrality policy that had been finalized and approved last month. They are questioning the powers granted to the FCC by Congress and hope some court action will gain them their way.

Verizon issued a Press Release, and although it's pretty vague and lacking key information we are made aware of their concern:

"We are deeply concerned by the FCC's assertion of broad authority for sweeping new regulation of broadband networks and the Internet itself. We believe this assertion of authority goes well beyond any authority provided by Congress, and creates uncertainty for the communications industry, innovators, investors, and consumers."

In a move to distance themselves from regulations, Verizon hopes the appeal will get the company out of the FCC's reach. However, if the appeal is not successful Verizon will be monitored by the FCC as long as it's providing internet by "radio, television, wire, satellite, or cable."

[Via
PCWorld]


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  • Bryan S.

    What are you afraid of, Red? I am a customer but not a loving one. Put Bing on my phone and leave it with Eclair forever, will you? I care not a bit what Verizon wants.

  • http://www.hostmycalls.com James Waldrop – HostMyCalls Hosted PBX Service

    The reason we are having a Net Neutrality debate is that there is not enough competition in the broadband market. Corporations like Comcast and Verizon must maximize their profit and act in the best interest of their shareholders. No where on their list of priorities do they have the utopian goal of protecting an open Internet. This does not make them evil. It is just the facts. How can an open Internet be in sync with the responsibilities of Comcast and Verizon? That is simple. Competition.

    Real time applications like Netflix, online gaming and VoIP are rapidly becoming the most popular uses on the Internet. Could Verizon and Comcast block or slow down some of this content while going head-to-head against a competitor that does not? Not likely since losing revenue would not be maximizing their profit potential. And that would be far more effective than any regulation government could ever put in place.