windows

Humble Indie Bundle 3 for Android launches

The latest iteration of the Humble Indie Bundle has arrived, and once again, its indie game goodness is being offered on Android. As with past bundles, the Humble Indie Bundle for Android 3 (which is a ridiculous name) lets buyers name their own price on a collection of indie games. A customizable portion of your purchase price goes to charity, so not only do you get a handful of excellent indie games on the cheap, but you also get to feel good about giving some money where it's truly needed.

Unofficial desktop Google Music Player available for Windows

Google Music is gaining momentum, and it's a great way to access your music collection. But one thing it's missing over the likes of iTunes is a desktop component - after all, plugging in your Android phone to your desktop speakers or going to the Google Music Website isn't always an ideal solution. Thankfully, DeviantArt user Victor Alberto Gil has created a desktop interface for the service. If you're a Windows user, you can download and run it now.

European carriers say Nokia should go Android

If you've been following smartphone news from some non-Android sources, you probably know that Nokia's Lumia 900 has made quite the splash over on AT&T. But apparently it's not doing so hot across the pond: reports out of European cell carriers say that their retail staff can't make a case for other Lumia phones like the 710 and the 800. Why? It's the software, of course - Nokia's gone full Windows Phone 7 with their smartphone line, something that's a hard sell for European customers expecting Android.

Splashtop Remote Desktop and GamePad on sale for 75% off

There's a lot of remote connection apps out there, but few have received the acclaim that Splashtop's has. The Splashtop Remote Desktop HD app lets your tablet remotely log into your Windows or OS X machine and control it remotely. As someone who's tried all the big VNC and RDP apps, I can say that it's surprisingly reliable - but perhaps not as reliable as its $20 price tag demands. It's a good thing, then, that the developer has put the app on sale for $4.99 in the Google Play Store, granting an awesome 75% discount.

Qualcomm invests in BlueStacks Android player

Have you tried out BlueStacks? If you're reading this on a Windows PC, you really should - it's an impressively simple way to get Android apps onto your full-sized computer, and ever since the software's beta update, it's only gotten better. BlueStacks' success has not gone unnoticed: TechCrunch reports are surfacing that chip maker Qualcomm (you know, the Snapdragon people) has invested in the company after an unusually strong showing this month. The amount of dollars changing hands isn't clear, but sources say it's in the millions.

Bluestacks App Player hacked for root and Google Play Store access

The Bluetstacks Android app player is already a pretty cool little service: after its recent upgrade to Beta status, it can handle just about any Android app on a Windows PC. The beta can sync apps from your Android phone or tablet, or download them directly from third-party apps stores, but like Steve Austin, it can be so much more. Like any Android "device", if you want to make it better, stronger, faster, then you've got to root that sucker. XDA member xRepinsSporx did just that, and he's kindly showed the world how to follow suit. And yes, you can install the Google Play Store.

BlueStacks App Player for Windows enters beta

One of the more exciting non-hardware innovations to pop on the Android scene last year was BlueStacks, a comprehensive piece of Windows software that allowed Android apps to be downloaded and installed on standard PCs. The program has graduated from alpha and entered its first beta - download it from their website now. (Sorry Mac users - they're working on it.) The update brings a host of new features, better performance and integration - if you were turned off by a low featureset before, you'll definetely want to check it out now.

BlueStacks Android app player gets 550,000+ downloads

Just in case you were wondering, yes, ore excited about the prospect of running Android apps on their full-sized computer. BlueStacks, the startup software package that lets you easily run and sync Android apps to any Windows computer, has racked up more than half a million downloads since its  October debut. 550,000 downloads is an impressive achievement for a program that was only released in alpha form seven weeks ago, and at the time lacked support for anything other than Windows 7.

BlueStacks Android emulator expands to Windows XP and Vista

If you're still holding on to your ancient Windows XP machine and you've got a hankering to try out the impressive BlueStacks app emulator, today is your lucky day. The software is expanding support to older Windows versions, XP and Vista, and it already supported Windows 7. Other than the expanded platform support there isn't much new, since the premium version and the OS X version are still in development.You can download the software from their website. BlueStacks got a lot of attention when they debuted their Android emulator, which allows quick and easy access to free Android apps. Users can also move apps from their Android phone to BlueStacks on their computer using a software portal. The performance isn't great at the moment - you'll need a powerful computer to run games smoothly - but the ability to run Android apps relatively painless ly on desktop hardware is alluring. It'll only become more so as Windows moves into the tablet realm with Windows 8.The software is already showing up on at least one ViewSonic tablet. AMD agrees. The processor company invested 5.6 million dollars into the company to spur its development, and help create a viable base of touch-enabled apps for x86 netbooks and tablets. With all this interest comes some very exciting times for BlueStacks - we'll probably be seeing them at the Consumer Electronics Show in January. We'll be on the lookout for more feature and platform updates.

Superboot v2 makes rooting the Galaxy Nexus a snap on Windows, Mac & Linux

Android enthusiasts tend to be pretty tech-savvy as a rule, at least by the standards of Aunt Rita and the rest of the population. But those with the real know-how that make rooting, flashing and other sundry modifications easy deserve some real props. Such is the case with Paul "Modaco" O'Brein. The second revision of his Superboot tool for rooting the Galaxy Nexus makes it even easier to get your superuser on, and it works with all major desktop platforms.
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