streaming audio

Sony Ericsson Live Walkman Announced, Runs Android 2.3 Gingerbread

The Walkman brand I'm sure many of you used back in the days isn't dying out anytime soon. The folks at Sony plan to keep it chugging along and today they have announced a new Sony Ericsson Live with Walkman handset running the best OS around, Android of course. Thinking back on the huge Walkman disk player I carried around in my younger days before the iPod was fun, but the 128 CD carry case I also tugged around wasn't. Now we can just throw all that music on a micro SD card and throw it in the new Live Walkman smartphone.

Google Music Beta Introduces Magnifier, Giving Away Free Music

Since the launch of Google Music we haven't heard much and it still is currently in beta. Now Google aims to flex some of that music muscle because they have just launched a new blog called Magnifier. The music blog will not only have future Google Music updates but will also highlight new and upcoming artists, give away free music and be a place people can find new and upcoming music they'd never usually find.

Sony In-Dash Car Stereo syncs to Pandora, Comes with Android Support

After years of waiting it appears Sony will finally be launching a full line of in-dash car audio receivers that will sync with all of our favorite Android devices. Sony and Pandora Radio have partnered up to bring car stereos with Pandora Internet Radio support to Android, iOS, and even those Blackberry phones. While playing music from our favorite devices might be nothing new to in-car stereo's doing it all wireless and with Pandora is -- sort of.

HTC Investing $300 Million into Beats Audio, Could this be the big News?

All sorts of suggestions and rumors have been floating around since we first heard HTC was planning a major announcement tomorrow. We quickly heard they had something big they would reveal tomorrow morning to the masses but instead of a press release or something of that nature they are having a conference call live with HTC CEO Peter Chou. We have just heard the news might not be a special new tablet, or the next big smartphone -- instead it could be that they are partnering with Beats Audio.

Google Music Beta gives each current user invites to share

Back in May, we talked about the Google Music Beta service that was set to launch. The launch of the cloud service was open to invitation only and if you didn't get an invitation, you may have been bummed. The good news is that if you know someone on the service already they will have invites they can hand out. You had better ask fast though since each of the users only gets a pair.

TuneIn Radio Pro adds stream recording

Who knows how long this will last, but RadioTime has released an update to it's popular TuneIn Radio Pro for Android app which allows for recording of radio streams. Users can simply tap on the red record button and the app saves the stream as an .m4a file. There's also a DVR function that allows users to pause and backup. Users can then play back the file through the TuneIn Radio app, upload it to DropBox, or even email it to a friend.

Spotify for Android updated: Faster, frugal streaming music

Spotify for Android has been updated, with the new version being quicker to load, having a tweaked UI and reducing its demands on battery. The tweaked app also now allows users to choose which storage device to keep cached tracks on, for Android devices with more than one memory card; music sync over WiFi is also said to be improved. There are also fixes for voice search and missing cover art, along with how audio restarts after phone calls. Devices with dedicated media buttons are also supported in v0.4.9 too. The Spotify app for Android is, as before, a free download. However you'll need a premium account with the service in order to actually use it when mobile.
  • Ability to choose storage location on devices with more than one memory card.
  • Changes to user interface.
  • Reduced startup time.
  • Improved battery life when using Spotify.
  • Volume control now always controls media volume, even if music is not playing.
  • Support for media buttons and audio focus APIs introduced in Froyo.
  • Much improved music syncing over WiFi.
  • Voice search now works properly when in Spotify.
  • Scrobbling issues have been fixed.
  • Bug causing missing cover art for local files has been fixed.
  • Failing to sync with locked screen has been fixed.
  • Music starting by itself after a phone call has been fixed.
  • Many other stability and performance improvements.

Livio Radio offers new Android app

The ability to stream and play music from the web or the cloud on your Android device is something that many users take advantage of. A new app for streaming radio from the internet has landed for Android devices. The new app comes from Livio and is the Livio Radio app.

Kazaa allows Android users to stream music without needing an app

If you are one of the folks that loves to listen to music everywhere you go and are a fan of Kazaa the company has announced a new breakthrough for mobile device users. Kazaa is now set up to allow Android, iPhone, and iPad users to stream digital music to their devices to listen to on the go without having to install an app.

Skifta Preview: Talking Streaming with Qualcomm’s Digital Media Gurus

We've been covering Qualcomm's Skifta project since almost the very beginning, from when the DLNA streaming media system was a simple 2009 side-project in the chipset company's labs, to its status as a legitimate standalone product with an eye on potential revenue streams. Android Community has had early access to the latest version of Skifta, hitting the Android Market today, to see whether a free app can really replace expensive media streaming systems around the home and office. Skifta build 68 does everything we're already familiar with from the app, so you get access to local media sources - such as your phone, NAS, computers sharing media and other devices - as well as streaming radio content, which can be squirted to a DLNA-compliant TV, WiFi radio or other device and controlled from your Android phone. A free download, it uses straightforward media plugins to add extra internet content; as for playback, if you have an internet-connected TV (or a DLNA-supporting streamer) then you're all set. As ever, as long as you have the bandwidth, it all works surprisingly well. The Skifta UI has been polished since the early days, with a three-step process of picking a source - audio, video or images, including Facebook and Picasa photos - then a playback device, and finally choosing which media you'd like to play. The new version adds in support for premium channels, like Napster; if you have a Napster account, you can log in and access the service's 10m+ streaming tracks. There's also new control over playback, to take into account the fact that not all media players are created equal. Given that many users have drives full of video and audio using different codecs, Skifta now allows you to choose which media player app on your phone you want to use to render the content. We loaded up vPlayer and Rock Player, and could choose between them in a simple Android dialog box. It means that files not natively supported by the Android media player can now often be played using a third-party player, and hugely extends the use of Skifta. We caught up with Skifta's director of marketing, Gary Brotman, at MWC 2011 last week, and talked to him about the future of the app and the growing Skifta ecosystem. With a long background in digital music - Brotman is actually behind one of the streaming radio channels featured in Skifta, Paper Buddha - he's unsurprisingly enthusiastic about the potential of the app, particularly when it comes to partnerships with other media sources. Napster - as added in build 68 - is just the start of it; Brotman is also keen to work with other subscription-based music services, such as Spotify. "It's less about owning music, today, and more about having access to it" he told us, suggesting that while people have historically built up huge stacks of CDs and records, and then gone on to amass collections of MP3s, the focus now is shifting away from ownership and more to ubiquity. Part of that is the increase in connectivity options, like 3G/4G on mobile devices and faster WiFi networks in homes and offices. "Previously, you had what content you could carry or had loaded up before you left" Brotman explained. As for making Qualcomm some money, Brotman is cautious of the usual ways Android apps are monetized. Although adverts are the obvious strategy - either AdWords in the app itself, or even audio or video promotions interspersed with the streamed content - he's wary of negatively impacting the user experience, especially when it comes to mining users' media catalogs for context-aware ads. Instead, the Skifta team is looking for more roundabout ways of commercialising the software, perhaps through affiliate links to download music from Amazon or other vendors. If you hear a track you like on a streaming radio station, Skifta could offer a one-click way of purchasing that music, with Qualcomm taking a slice of the proceeds. Alternatively, if more premium channels - such as Spotify - get onboard, Skifta could take a tithe of their subscription revenue too. Of course, there's always the potential for Skifta to evolve into a paid version, or perhaps split into free and premium, though for now the app remains a free download. You can find the updated build 68 in the Android Market; don't forget to let us know how you get on in the comments.
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