source code

HTC delivers DROID DNA source code

Good news for those of you who value customization options: HTC has released the source code and binaries for the freshly launched DROID DNA. With a phone as nice as that, we can imagine that developers are all too eager to get their hands on the source code. The source code arrives just a few days after we learned that the DROID DNA's bootloader was unlocked, so the phone's potential tweakability just went through the roof.

Samsung releases source code for Galaxy Note II

Samsung has decided to release the Source Code for the Galaxy Note II. The device has been released in select European countries and that means that custom ROM developers are looking to sink their teeth into the code. If you like installing custom firmware on your devices, this is fantastic news for you. Of course, most users will look at this code and have no idea what any of it means. That's fine; there are plenty of people out there who know just what to do with this publicly available code. We can only assume that developers like CyanogenMod are already hard at work coming up with some awesome custom ROMs for the newly minted device as we speak. Samsung has always been quick to release code to the public, and the 5.5 inch Galaxy Note II is no exception. This release includes the kernel source code, as well as everything else that makes the device tick. Hardware developers releasing source code allows the custom ROM community to make more stable mods, which is certainly a good thing for all involved. The quicker they can release stable builds, the better. The Note II, which is based on Android 4.1.1 and features Samsung's TouchWiz interface, will be rooted much quicker with the release of this source code, and that makes all of us happy. [via Android Police]

Source code for Open webOS Galaxy Nexus port goes public

When it comes to Open webOS on Android, things seem to progressing rather quickly. Open webOS isn't even a week old yet, but within a few hours after HP released it, it was already booting on the Galaxy Nexus. Just a couple of days later we saw it booting on the Transformer Prime, and today, the source code for the Galaxy Nexus port has been posted online, so the open source community can officially go nuts.

Samsung releases Galaxy S III source code

Now that the Samsung Galaxy S III has launched in more than 28 countries Samsung has decided it's time to release the source code, and developers can't thank them enough. This is how it's supposed to be done folks. Today Samsung has released the full source code for the GT-i9300 (SGSIII) and it's available for download now.

Five custom skin and ROM features that stock Android needs

We love the Open Source Android Project. It's where the Android community starts, where ROM developers go for "blessed" code, and without it, Android would still be puttering along behind lesser platforms. But the really great thing about Android is that it's adaptable - and anyone can adapt is. Many custom ROM developers out there (and, to be fair, manufacturers as well) have made natural and obvious additions to Android that are so useful, Google should go ahead and add them right into the main development tree. Here are five of my favorites:

Samsung Galaxy Note ICS source code now available

For all the ire that Samsung draws with its TouchWiz interface and mostly late software updates, the company is surprisingly forward when it comes to supporting the open source aspects of Android. Bootloaders aren't an issue (we're looking at you, Moto and HTC) and source code is delivered in a timely manner. So it is with the Galaxy Note: a couple of weeks after sending out the Ice Cream Sandwich update to international models, they've posted the source code for same.

Latest Linux kernel release adds Android code

It's often forgotten these days, but at its heart Android is a Linux-based operating system (with a healthy dose of C and Java thrown in). Today that association gets a little closer, as the primary Linux kernel version 3.3 is adding some Android-specific code into the primary development branch. Android is technically a "fork" of Linux, but this brings a little of the work that Google and others have done on the Android Open Source project back into the main Linux project directly.
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