security

Whisper calls The Guardian piece on privacy issues ‘vicious lies’

Whisper, the app that lets you post whatever you want under the guise of anonymity, says that a recent Guardian piece, which accuses them of various privacy violations, is a pack of "vicious lies." The British newspaper recently claimed to have inside information that despite the premise of the app, they were tracking user information and even going as far as giving out details to various government agencies. Officials from the app immediately refuted these accusations and will give out further statements to prove their innocence.

AT&T says sorry for breach of security caused by an employee

An insider breach recently shook AT&T. One of its employees reportedly accessed important information of a number of customers. The mobile carrier was humble enough to report the incident and warn customers about the data breach. Information obtained included diver’s license and Social Security numbers of unknown number of AT&T subscribers.

CM Security app updated, now with Intruder Selfie

Reports of phones getting hacked and contents being leaked on the Internet can be quite scary. I don’t agree with taking photos ‘NSFW’ because anyone could see them even if you’re being to careful. You can lock all the photo albums you want but the phone can be stolen, right?

Samsung targets Android enterprise integration with Knox

Android was designed with open-source, open-market viability in mind – so it was, by design, low in “private sandbox” security features. This is something that makes the platform a very risky one for those in enterprise security. Enclosed architectures like BlackBerry OS and iOS have legitimate advantages here in one sense, but Samsung is belatedly trying to join the party with its KNOX B2B (business-to-business) apps.

Android L to offer devices encryption as default out-of-the-box

Just to set things straight, encryption of personal data has been available to Android users since 2011. It was one of those features that users rarely talk about and never get around to using. But with the spate of high-profile leaks of personal data – videos, pictures, and the like – a lot more people are now looking to security features in devices to protect sensitive and personal data. Enter Google’s announcement that the next Android operating system release – presently known as Android L and set to be launched pretty soon – will have encryption turned on by default for devices which will carry the new OS.

Qualcomm SafeSwitch hardware kill will land next year

When it comes to stopping smartphone thieves from being able to use your stolen device, lock codes help to some extent to protect your data. While that might protect the data you have stored on your device, the thief could still wipe the phone and sell it online. Qualcomm has unveiled a hardware kill switch that will render stolen or lost devices unusable.