security

WhatsApp now uses TextSecure code, end-to-end encryption guaranteed

We’re always on the lookout for the most secure messaging app. What with all the reports of hacking and security issues, people are clamoring for that one system that is safe, encrypted, and will allow fully protection and privacy. It seems impossible because anyone can get into something. Even the supposedly most secure network can be breached with minimal effort. WhatsApp is bringing a stronger encryption making the app even more secure compared to the messaging tools by Apple, Google, and Microsoft.

DOJ spying on our cellphones, getting data via dirtyboxes?

Is the US Department of Justice trying to spy on us now? Of course, the DOJ will never admit that but there’s a rumor going on that the group has been getting data from the people’s smartphones. No, DOJ is using some geek’s master hacking skills or old wiretapping tech. There’s a report by the Wall Street Journal that says the group is flying a device overhead that spoofs signal tower from network carriers.

Cyanogen teases Scramble PIN Layout, Lollipop port starts [CORRECTION]

Do you ever get that feeling of someone watching you as you try to tap in your PIN code on your smartphone, trying to guess the pattern you make and therefore the digits you type in? Such knowledge would be handy in case said mysterious onlookers have plans to divest you of your device. If so, worry no longer. Cyanogen, Inc. has devised a new unlock feature that will mix up those numbers every time you try to unlock your phone, causing confusion for the would-be thief. And maybe even for you.

Everykey wristband wants to place all your passwords on your wrist

With the growing pressure to memorize more and more complicated passwords, some people are thinking along the ways of an automated password storage – where the device does the remembering for you rather than our definitely fallible brains. “Everykey” is a Kickstarter project towards this idea – a wearable bracelet-type device that connects and unlocks your devices and websites for you.

Samsung says Find My Mobile safe, despite NIST warning

The National Institute of Standards and Technology issued a warning last week that Samsung's Find My Mobile feature on some of its devices is very "hackable" due to numerous security vulnerabilities. But the OEM has now issued a statement saying that the issue mentioned has already been fixed early last month and assured users that no information has been compromised, while at the same time, issuing warnings on how attackers may be able to access your device remotely.

Fingerprint-locked smartphones may be used as evidence

A ruling by a judge in Virginia Beach in an attempted murder case may very well change how the court views fingerprint-locked gadgets as evidence in ongoing cases. The judge granted the prosecutors petition to have access to the defendant's smartphone, saying that unlike password or pin protected devices, biometrics is considered a physical object and so you can be compelled to relinquish it, just like DNA or fingerprint evidence.

Google sells Android 5.0 Lollipop as one tough candy

All the sweetness and prettiness won't be enough to console you if your smartphone or tablet gets stolen, which is why Google has toughened up the latest Android 5.0 to meet the needs of the increasingly insecure mobile device world. Google now highlights the key achievements it made in coating Android Lollipop with a sheet of armor, but the question always is whether it's enough. As always, the answer depends on the user, but Google is at least pushing them in the right direction.

NIST reports vulnerability of Samsung’s Find My Mobile feature

“Find my phone” type apps are numerous – just go to the Google Play Store and have a quick search. But one of the main features of newer Samsung top tier devices is that they have this capability built in with the “Find My Mobile” service. But the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has just sounded a warning, saying that the feature a real security vulnerability and is very much “hackable”.

Lockdown Pro allows selectively locking almost any app

We are trust our smartphones with private data more and more, and it is becoming so difficult to keep that data away from people who just want to compromise your privacy. Enter Lockdown Pro, a pretty awesome app that allows you to lock your apps whether you’re a newbie or a seasoned user – and it looks great to boot. Best of all, it’s completely free – with in-app purchases, of course.

Google steps up 2-step security with USB Security Key

With the security situation these days, a password, especially a simple, easy to guess, and reused one, just no longer cuts it. To help users who may or may not have migrated to stronger passwords, some sites and services have implemented two-step authentication that takes advantage of the smartphone that we almost always have with us nearby. Taking that to a somewhat more convenient but more limited level, Google is introducing Security Key, which uses a USB flash drive to implement that very same security feature.
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