Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1

Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 delayed to June, getting upgrade to Exynos quad-core

Big news appears to have hit the streets over the past couple of days regarding Samsung's next onslaught of Android tablets. Earlier this week we reported the Galaxy Tab 2 with Android 4.0 ICS was delayed until late April although no reason was released. Today we are now hearing the Galaxy Note 10.1 has also been delayed, but with good reason. The delay is because it will be receiving a quad-core instead.

Samsung strikes back – compares Galaxy Note 10.1 vs new iPad

The all new iPad was just announced only a few short hours ago, and while CEO Tim Cook was on stage he was quick to take a few stabs at Android and Samsung regarding tablets and the user experience. Now after the final specs have been confirmed Samsung is already fighting back. They have released their own little "content creation" and comparison chart showing just how much better they think their Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet is over the Apple iPad 3rd Gen.

Samsung has an “exciting special announcement” for SXSW on March 9th

Samsung Mobile recently sent out a press release letting us all know what events to expect from the SXSW festival in Austin, Texas. The 'special announcement' will likely be the showing of the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 rather than the much anticipated Galaxy S III. Reason being, is that the entire event accentuates the Galaxy Note throughout the press release; it would still hold true after the 10.1's announcement.

Samsung releases version 2.0 of S-Pen SDK

Just in time to prepare your apps for the Galaxy Note 10.1, Samsung has released the first major revision to its stylus SDK to developers. The S-Pen Software Development Kit 2.0 expands on the tools first released even before the original Samsung Galaxy Note, allowing for various enhancements to pen input accuracy and new APIs for third-party applications to take advantage of. You can download the updated SDK at Samsung's Innovator developer hub.

Android Community Evening Wrap-Up: February 27, 2012

Since we're live at MWC, you've undoubtedly noticed the massive amount of hands-on articles we've managed to get up today. So instead of a wrap-up, this will consist more of a 'hands-on' summary of devices for our second day at MWC. First up, we got to glance at the new Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1. We received a few snapshots with it alongside the original 5.3" Galaxy Note for an easy comparison. Usually you don't see devices ship with Adobe Photoshop, but the Note 10.1 will already include Photoshop Touch and Adobe Ideas - a few apps that cost $10 each on the Android Market.

Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 hands-on

Earlier today we got an eyes-only look at Samsung's newest member of its stylus family, the Galaxy Note 10.1. We swung by Samsung's booth later in the day to get a closer look. The Galaxy Note 10.1 is physically similar to the new Galaxy Tab 2 10.1 (man, they've got to work on those names) but uses a faster processor, an active digitizer stylus and Samsung's customized apps. As an extension of the original Galaxy Note it's pretty compelling - much more so than the lukewarm refresh that the primary Galaxy Tab line seems to be getting.

Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 official: we go eyes-on

Long live pen-based input! That seems to be Samsung's new watchword, as they're expanding the Note series from the 5.3-inch Galaxy Note to a new 10.1-inch model, based around their primary Galaxy Tab line. It's a familiar device if you've ever held a Galaxy Tab 10.1, even more so if you happen to have seen the German G-Tab 10.1N, as the new series of tablets copies its speaker-forward design. Specification wise, it gets an upgraded 1.4 dual-core Exynos processor and a new "8 Pi" S-pen works in conjunction with a Wacom digitizer and Samsung touch apps. Storage gets a new, larger 64GB option - otherwise, the tablet is identical to the Galaxy Tab 10.1 2. The biggest changes to the user experience come from a series of software apps running on the Ice Cream Sandwich-TouchWiz OS. In addition to the pen-based input, Samsung is pushing its "Live Panels" series of widgets, calling the experience a Multi-Screen interface. There's a heavy emphasis on notation, with magazine, diary, flash card and sketchbook apps. But it's more than just simple input: built-in handwriting and pattern recognition can convert your words to electronic text, even for standard mathematical functions. Simple shapes can be vectorized using Samsung's proprietary software. And it isn't just Samsung who's invited to the party. The Galaxy Note 10.1 includes Adobe's Photoshop Touch and Adobe Ideas, a pair of apps that normally cost $10 each. They both take advantage of the digitizer and stylus to sense pressure, speed and stroke, not unlike the desktop version of Photoshop working with a Wacom digital pad. Other Samsung pen-enabled apps include Slice It! and Comic Book as well as Catch Notes, Touchnote, and Hello Crayon. Samsung hasn't said when the larger Galaxy Note will become available, or for how much. Since they wouldn't let us handle the device ourselves, we've got to assume that there's a good bit of software engineering left to do. Obviously it'll warrant a premium over the standard Galaxy Tab 2 10.1 model, but since that is (and this is being generous) a light refresh at best, there's no way to know how much that will cost when it comes to market, either. Considering the added pen-based functionality and the new Samsung processor, the Galaxy Note 10.1 can now be considered Samsung's flagship tablet. We've been keeping an eye open around MWC 2012 for that rumored 11.6-inch tablet, but so far, it hasn't appeared. [gallery]

Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 tipped via MWC advertising

We'd heard rumblings of larger form factors in Samsung's brand new Galaxy Note family before, but this would seem to seal the deal. A Swedish blogger caught a glimpse of some covered ads prior to Samsung's Mobile World Congress event showing nothing less than the Galaxy Note 10.1, a combination of the ten-inch tablet form factor and Samsung's new pen input hardware and software. There's little to go on at this point beyond the name and a brief, tempting glance at the corner of the device, but there's plenty that can be inferred.
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