root

Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 10.1 rooted

Ah, root. It's a sort of coming-of-age test for an Android device, in that brief (and sometimes nonexistent) gap between a phone's retail release and the point at which the modder community beats it into software submission. The time has come for the Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 10.1, the mild refresh to one of the most successful 10-inch Android tablets out there. Thanks to the folks at XDA, you can now get both root permissions and a custom recovery on your shiny new tablet.

AT&T, Rogers HTC One X rooted

AT&T customers are still pretty upset at the arbitrary locked bootloader on the HTC One X, but at least they can do some basic modifications: root has been achieved. XDA Developers member Kenneth Penn has posted a one-click root solution for the LTE version of the One X, and it should also work on the phone headed for Canadian carrier Rogers as well. You'll need a Windows PC and a basic understanding of Android, but as far as root process go, it's relatively easy.

WiFi Tether back in the Play Store – for now

It's been quite a while since mainstream wireless tethering apps were available in the Android Market/Google Play Store, presumably because US carriers aren't keen to see free alternatives to their paid services. The most popular third-party tethering app, WiFi Tether for Root Users, has mysteriously re-appeared in the Google Play Store - you can download it for free right now. Who knows how long it will stay there, but in any case, we're happy to see it return.

Pantech Element gets root and custom recovery

What's the use of having a waterproof tablet if you can't get a little dirty... figuratively speaking, anyway. That seems to be the inspiration behind RootzWiki members attn1 and roman220, who gave the gift of root to AT&T's Pantech Element tablet just today and immediately installed ClockworkMod recovery to, as it were, boot. The process is fairly simple as root goes: connect the tablet to your computer with ADB enabled, get into the fastboot interface, send over a custom image, then download a SuperUser app and you're done. Check out the original thread for more precise instructions.

Samsung Galaxy S Blaze 4G gets root and custom recovery

The Samsung Galaxy S Blaze 4G has been lighting up T-Mobile's airwaves for about three weeks now, during which its owners were sadly bereft of rooting and ROM flashing options. But as usual, the community comes through: XDA user k0nane gifted Blaze owners with root early this morning, and it was hardly any time at all before fellow member shabbypenguin got a method of getting the venerable ClockworkMod recovery up and running. Neither process is as easy as it is on some devices: you'll be messing with Samsung's proprietary flashing tool Odin to get everything up and running, which is handy, since it's aparently pretty easy to wipe your phone in the process.

Bluestacks App Player hacked for root and Google Play Store access

The Bluetstacks Android app player is already a pretty cool little service: after its recent upgrade to Beta status, it can handle just about any Android app on a Windows PC. The beta can sync apps from your Android phone or tablet, or download them directly from third-party apps stores, but like Steve Austin, it can be so much more. Like any Android "device", if you want to make it better, stronger, faster, then you've got to root that sucker. XDA member xRepinsSporx did just that, and he's kindly showed the world how to follow suit. And yes, you can install the Google Play Store.

CyanogenMod decides root access should be optional

Devices running custom ROM's have always been rooted. This is just how things are in the world of Android. Root gives you full control and access to well, root of your device. The power is yours after rooting. Yes you read our title right, moving forward the extremely popular CyanogenMod 9 will no longer be rooted. It will instead be a simple option to enable, but for security sake it will be optional.

Modaco roots HTC One S, surprises no one

Ready for yet another pre-release root story? Noted Android ROM developer and modder Paul "Modaco" O'Brien has rooted the upcoming HTC One S, less than a week after doing the same for the big daddy HTC One X. Of course the HTC One S isn't actually available in any market just yet, but Android fans can rest easy knowing that they can do so the minute they get the phone in their hot little hands. The superboot method favored by O'Brien is in full effect, but HTC will need to unlock the bootloader first. There shouldn't be any problem with that, considering their recent developer-friendly stance.