reddit

HTC holding a Reddit AMA this afternoon

If you’ve been reading about HTC the past two years, you know their troubles. A failed partnership with Beats, diminished customer interest, and poor sales have dogged them. The One was/is a good handset, but failed to be the silver bullet they needed. Perhaps you’d just like to ask them yourself what’s going on. Now’s your chance.

Viddme allows for anonymous video uploads, even via mobile

Anonymity is pretty important to most of us. Though there are workarounds to mask our identity, there are few options for true distance when it comes to tethering ourselves to content. In Google’s ecosystem, we must have an identity across their services, like YouTube. Viddme is challenging that, and wants to do for video what Imgur has for photos.

Amazon cloud outage brings Reddit, Pinterest, Netflix down

Amazon's cloud services seem to be struggling a bit today, as our friends at SlashGear are reporting that a failure has brought down a number of huge sites like Netflix, Reddit, Pinterest, and Foursquare. The outage, according to Amazon's own Web Service Dashboard, looks to be the fault of Amazon's EC2 services, but we're pleased to say that things are getting better. Whereas before, EC2's status alerted that "new launches for EBS backed instances are failing," at the moment, the status is "Degraded EBS performance in a single Availability Zone."

Skyrim Unlocker concept is all the rage in the Thieves Guild

I you've been following the Android Reddit for the last few days, you've probably seen a few concept screens for a lockscreen inspired by Bethesda's RPG magnum opus, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim. Well, a developer going by "DaveRun" has finally gotten the ball rolling in earnest, developing a concept app that mimics the console and PC game's lock-picking interface almost perfectly. It doesn't actually unlock the phone yet since it's at the proof of concept stage, but Dave's getting a lot of support from like-minded users on his post. You can download the non-Market app and install it on any Android phone.

Google vulnerability reward program could really tighten up security for Android

I've known about Chrome's vulnerability reward program for quite some time, but never considered moving the design over to Android. Reddit user CunningLogic suggests it would give developers a monetary reward for their handwork while making Android more secure in the long run. Sounds good to me. Just like development within Chrome, the developers hard at work within Android have been extremely good at pointing out OS security flaws; with a form of payment, devs will get that extra incentive/motivation to tighten up loose ends and help make Android OS better.