patents

Microsoft inks license deal with Nikon for Android-powered cameras

It's no secret that patent wars have been a major problem in the mobile space. Especially for a few of the big hitters like Samsung, Microsoft, and Apple. For those not following along at home Microsoft holds multiple key patents and has inked deals with just about everyone in the Android tablet and smartphone market for royalties. Now that Nikon has an Android camera, they're also getting thrown in the Microsoft coin jar.

Apple Store gains trademark while Google remains in the cloud

While Google seems intent on remaining in the cloud in terms of device sales, one thing has recently been made clear -- should they decide to go the retail route with stores of their own, they should not have them looking like an Apple Store. The reasoning here, Apple has recently been granted an official US trademark (from the USPTO) for their retail stores.

Samsung’s infringement of Apple patents declared not willful

In its high-profile patent case against Apple, Samsung has taken quite a few hits. This week, however, Samsung is catching a rather large break, as Judge Lucy Koh has decided to accept the company's claims that it wasn't infringing willfully. This means the amount Samsung has been ordered to pay Apple probably won't increase much moving forward, which is likely something making Samsung's attorneys exhale a sigh of a relief today.

FTC and Google reach settlement on antitrust investigation

As expected today, the FTC has brought their investigation to a close regarding good old Google. The folks from Mountain View reached a settlement and as a result will not face any fines. After a nearly 2-year investigation into the mobile and search giants operations, mainly with search and unfair practices, things are finally reaching a close and Google can move on.

Antitrust charges on the way for Samsung from European Commission

More bad news for Samsung today, as the European Commission told Reuters that it may soon be hitting the Galaxy S III maker with antitrust charges. These possible anti-competitive charges come after a larger and longer investigation of Samsung carried out by the European Commission. Essentially, the European Commission wants to know if Samsung broke the EU's competition rules by filing patent suits against Apple.

Apple multitouch patent tentatively declared invalid by USPTO

Most of us are already familiar with Apple's '949 multi-touch patent, more famously know as "The Steve Jobs patent." It has been used against a number of companies in patent suits, but unfortunately for Apple, the United States Patent and Trademark Office declared today that all 20 claims of it are invalid. FOSS Patents reports that the USPTO did so with a first Office action, which is considered to be something of a preliminary action.

Apple files patent for wireless charging from up to 1 meter away

The guys from Cupertino have been busy with patents lately, and today we have one more to report on. It appears that Apple has filed for a patent regarding wireless charging. Yes, a feature we enjoy in our Nexus 4, the new Nokia Lumia, and multiple other devices. Better hide those Nexus 4's before it's too late. The patent is based around wireless charging technology using magnetic resonance -- something that's been around for some time. More details after the break.

Judge allows Samsung to peek in on HTC and Apple’s patent deal

In case you haven't been following along, Samsung and Apple have been fighting in court quite a bit this year. Earlier this month Apple and HTC settled their differences and came up with a 10-year agreement deal. While this is good for HTC, Samsung has still been getting beat up pretty bad by those Cupertino lawyers but recently a Judge has thrown them a bone in regards to the HTC deal. Read on for more details.

Google vs. Microsoft patent trial wraps up with big claims

Hearings in the patent lawsuit between Google and Microsoft are winding down, and with the final day of testimony came one whopper of a claim from Motorola. Yesterday, Motorola sent expert Michael Dansky to the stand, who testified that Microsoft stands to make as much as $94 billion through 2017 with the allegedly illegal use of Motorola patents. His estimate includes products like the Xbox 360 and Microsoft Surface, but Reuters points out that Dansky didn't say how far back he was going to arrive at his estimate.
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