OHA

LG Ally site goes live with limited specs

The official mini site for the LG Ally is now live, a few specs come along for the ride as well. This device will be hitting shelves real soon. Verizon has been rumored to be the carrier of this device since we first heard about it.

Two Dragons From LG in Korea

We’re all aware of the existence of the LG LU2300, aka the Aloha when it comes to the US. LG has released another Snapdragon powered Android device in Korea, the LG KU9500/SU950. These handsets have a few things in common but unlike the 2300 the 9500 is an all touch screen device.

T-Mobile USA Announces Garminfone

It’s been a long time coming but the long awaited Gamifone has been announced for a T-Mobile release. Garmin was one of the first members of the OHA, promised to produce an Android handset, seemed like it would never come to fruition. This may be the first announcement of great Android devices for T-Mobile.

LG Aloha Shows up in Verizon’s Inventory

Looks like my earlier suspicion of the LG LU2300 being renamed ALOHA, aka LG VS740 as it’s called in Verizon’s system, has come true. Verizon will have an impressive Android lineup this spring/summer with the addition of this, another 2.1 device that also has a 1GHZ Snapdragon and other great features.

Dell Aero hands-on and UI walkthrough – Video

Like most new phones, AT&T and Dell are trying to keep the information on this phone tight lipped until they are ready to officially introduce it. Engadget managed to get some hands on time with the Aero at this year’s CTIA and there were a few surprises packed into this phone. Needless to say they are not the type of surprises we like around here.

Android With A Palm Pre Like Form Factor?

If you love Android but also like the styling of the Palm Pre you can soon have the best of both worlds. Introducing, the upcoming Alcatel OT-980 Android slider phone from a French OHA member and new comer to the Android game. 

Garmin releasing their own Android-powered device in 2009

The Android platform recently got AndNav2, the first turn-by-turn navigation application for Android without the need for a monthly subscription plan. We suspected that Garmin was going to release their Garmin mobile turn-by-turn application for Android sometime in 2009. Our members are already very excited about Android reaching out to other types of devices as Google has promised. Now Garmin has finally announced that they will be releasing their own Android-powered devices sometime in the second half of 2009, shortly after the company’s delayed nuvifone. According to Asia Pacific marketing director, Tony An, the nuvifone will hit the Taiwan market in Q2 2009, with self-developed Android devices coming later. There are still very few details as to Garmin’s Android-powered handset. But what we do know is the device will be completed exclusively in-house by Garmin and only manufactured externally. An went on to say that the company expects sales to jump as much as 50 percent next year due to the growing market for navigation systems.  Garmin recently joined the Open Handset Alliance (OHA) as one of the 14 new members. No one knew whether they would be writing software for current devices or creating devices of their own.  We will bring you more information on this device as it becomes available. [Via SlashGear]

Huawei will release Android-powered handset in 2009

Huawei said that Australian telecommunications companies would be able to start selling their Chinese based Android-powered handsets by the third quarter of 2009 if they would like to. Huawei was one of the companies to enter the Open Handset Alliance (OHA) earlier this month announcing plans to bring an Android-powered handset to market in 2009. Australia was excluded from the launch of the T-Mobile G1, but now Telcos has the choice not Huawei. "Huawei can confirm that their first Android smartphone is scheduled to launch in the third quarter of 2009. Huawei's smartphones can be ordered and developed for Australian operators based on any such requests," the spokesperson said. Kogan Technologies' Agora, which will hit Australia on January 29th, is still going to be the first to legally make it to Australia. We are also expecting several Android-powered handsets out of China throughout 2009. We certainly hope to see much growth with Android in the coming year, especially in the Android Market, which has seemed to slow to a crawl. [Via CNET]

Jason Chen answers questions about Android

Right after the Google IO keynote on Tuesday, I rushed off to attend the press conference and as result missing the first few Android sessions.  It's a good thing that Ed Burnette of ZDNet, we have a few more questions answered as well as clearing up some confusion regarding the Android platform.

The Introduction to Android platform session lasted around 90-minutes.  Jason announced that the source code to Android is currently available to Google's Open Handset Alliance (OHA) partners.  The general public will get access to the source code when the first handset (that being the Android HTC Dream phone) ships.  At such time, Android will be called "Android Version 1.0."  Android version 1.0 will be available to everyone and anyone who wants to download and port Android to any phone or any other devices they so desire.  Once Android version 1.0 hits the street, you do not have to be an OHA member and you don't need to sign anything or ask for anyone's permission to install Android on any device.  The audience wanted to know when will Android version 1.0 be available.  Unfortunately, Google would not provide any specific dates other than "the second half of 2008."  When pressed, a Google source stated that it wasn't really their call alone to make.  The release date is largely up to OHA members, especially manufacturers making the phones and the carriers who will sell and distribute the Android phones.  Lets hope all 31+ OHA members don't take too long to decide when's the best time to release Android version 1.0. After his presentation, Jason opened up the floor for questions... Q. What if somebody wants to build an application that is similar to a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) that can run other programs. What security implications are there for these kinds of applications? A. It's possible to do but we haven't thought about it. There is a large security team working on Android. There are languages that are working to port their bytecode to the Dalvik VM, so it won't just be for the Java language. Q. Traditionally carriers rip out things. What steps do you take to prevent somebody like Cingular from making an "almost-Android" phone? A. They could do that if they wanted because it's open source. But Android is a complete stack of software so why would you want to break it? There's value in a full stack and in a lot of applications. There's no incentive to alter it in ways that wouldn't be compatible. We want manufacturers and operators to customize in ways they can differentiate. They don't all have to have the same home screen, the same look and feel, and so forth but they should be able to run any Android apps. Q. When do developers get hardware? A. When everybody else does (when retail phones are for sale). Q. Does Android platform development follow the JSR (Java Specification Request) model? A. Android is not Java technology. It uses the Java programming language but Dalvik is not a JVM. It's not claiming to be Java tech. Q. Is support for Flash lite planned? A. Not at the moment. Q. Will there be an SDK for PPC Macs? A. Don't think so. Just Intel. Q. Will you have aesthetic standards like the iPhone? A. We're working with UI designers to put out a user interface guideline. Also android provides standard UI widgets. About Jason Chen Jason is currently a developer advocate at Google where he works on ensuring that developers for the Android platform are successful. He previously led the developer support team for Google Checkout. Prior to joining Google, Jason worked at IBM and Urchin Software.