malware

Avast! Anti-Virus for Android in the works, Rooted users will get extra funtions

Avast! one of the most popular and widely used anti-malware program for Windows will be releasing for Android soon. This app will help secure your device safely and if you’re a rooted user, you’ll be granted extra features. Avast recently announced that the app for Android was in the works but the surprise is they will be allowing those extra features for those that root.

Apps suspended from Android Market after Plankton malicious code discovered

A security researcher has discovered a new malicious code on the Android Market that was circulating in some apps. The code is called Plankton and was discovered inside some apps related to Angry Birds. The malicious code ran as a background service making it hard to discover. The goal of the app appears to have been an attempt to give some unidentified user access to an Android device remotely.

Popular Games on Android devices have fee deduction malware says NetQin

A security firm called NetQin has identified a new malware threat against Android users. The threat has a fee deduction app inside some games to steal money from the players. The malware is disguised as the games Mole Attack, Jawbreaker, and Five Chess among others. The apps will subscribe the players to paid services without permission resulting in fraudulent charges. NetQin says that so far the malware has only infected Chinese users.

New Malware from the Folks That Brought You DroidDream

It's been a few months since we first reported on the outbreak of "Droid Dream," a piece of malware which was found present on the Android Market. Now it appears that a new, stripped down DroidDream is appearing in the market, and has affected tens of apps from no less than 6 developers. Google has removed the apps from the market, but we aren't sure if they've used their kill switch to nuke the apps from any phones that have downloaded them at this time.

Google Nabs more Exploits from the MarketPlace

The latest battle in the war against malicious apps is joined as Google has reported via it's mobile blog that a number of new Android Apps repackaged with malware have been removed. In addition to wiping the apps from the Marketplace, Google is in the process of removing the malicious applications via remote from affected handsets. They've also banned the suspect publishers and are calling in the long arm of the law. According to Google, the malicious applications are taking advantage of a known vulnerability in Android versions 2.1 and below, so users with handsets running Android 2.2 (Froyo) and above aren't affected.

Android Malware Apps get official attention …

Recently there's been some concern about malware in the Android Marketplace. Hackers have been repackaging legitimate Android applications with spyware embedded and resubmitting them, causing mobile devices to be infected with malware after download. Here's some official words from Linda Liu, Global Marketing Director of the mobile security firm NetQin, on the steps Google is taking to combat the trend:
Recently, a new spyware named "DroidDream" causing privacy leakage was found on Google's Android Market. The spyware was embedded in repackaged legitimate applications and uploaded to the Android Market by the developers "Myournet", "Kingmall2010" and "we20090202". Mobile devices will be infected after download. Google has removed more than 50 infected applications from Android Market and remote deleted the infected apps downloaded to the users' devices to prevent further spreading of the malware. Even though Google has taken a series of control measures in the wake of the event, there seems to be a need for more to be done.

Soundminer Trojan steals data by listening

Researchers have apparently developed a new low-profile Trojan that runs on the Android OS that can steal data in a very sneaky way that will not trip antivirus software or alert the user to its presence. The malware is known as Soundminer.

Android exploit turns smartphone into USB security hole

A new exploit potentially turning Android phones into USB hacking tools has been revealed, which might make users more wary of plugging smartphones into their computers to sync or recharge. The exploit, developed by Angelos Stavrou and Zhaohui Wang, infects an Android device so that it mounts as a regular HID (human interface device) keyboard and mouse on a PC, Mac or Linux machine. With that access, the malware author could then retrieve files, download other malware or even take control of the system altogether, depending on the nature of the exploit code. Versions of the exploit have been written for computers and for the Android kernel; an iOS version would also be possible, the researchers claim.
"Say your computer at home is compromised and you compromise your Android phone by connecting them. Then, whenever you connect the smartphone to another laptop or computing device I can take over that computer also, and then compromise other computers off that Android. It's a viral type of compromise using the USB cable" Angelos Stavrou

Sophos says Android will be targeted by Facebook-based attacks

Sophos has announced that it thinks Android will be a big target this year for Facebook-based malware attacks. Sophos' senior technology consultant Graham Cluley said, "The iPhone operates in a more controlled environment and the BlackBerry security model is fairly strong. Because Android operates in a more open environment, it's more open to infections."
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