malware

Fake Google+ app floating around hides Android malware

Android users that are fans of Google+ need to be aware that a new malware app is circulating right now. Earlier this month I mentioned that Android users were twice as likely to get malware as they were six months ago. One of the reasons is apps like Google++ that looks like an official Google+ app and hides a malicious app inside.

Android fans are twice as likely to get malware today as they were six months ago

The number of malware apps for the Android smartphone and tablet users to contend with is growing all the time. Some of the malware seeks to make money charging for bogus services and some wants to do other things like record your calls. CNET reports that a new report from Lookout shows that Android users are twice as likely to run across malware today compared to six months ago. The figures are based on detection rates from Lookout users on Android.

Avast! Anti-Virus for Android in the works, Rooted users will get extra funtions

Avast! one of the most popular and widely used anti-malware program for Windows will be releasing for Android soon. This app will help secure your device safely and if you’re a rooted user, you’ll be granted extra features. Avast recently announced that the app for Android was in the works but the surprise is they will be allowing those extra features for those that root.

Apps suspended from Android Market after Plankton malicious code discovered

A security researcher has discovered a new malicious code on the Android Market that was circulating in some apps. The code is called Plankton and was discovered inside some apps related to Angry Birds. The malicious code ran as a background service making it hard to discover. The goal of the app appears to have been an attempt to give some unidentified user access to an Android device remotely.

Popular Games on Android devices have fee deduction malware says NetQin

A security firm called NetQin has identified a new malware threat against Android users. The threat has a fee deduction app inside some games to steal money from the players. The malware is disguised as the games Mole Attack, Jawbreaker, and Five Chess among others. The apps will subscribe the players to paid services without permission resulting in fraudulent charges. NetQin says that so far the malware has only infected Chinese users.

New Malware from the Folks That Brought You DroidDream

It's been a few months since we first reported on the outbreak of "Droid Dream," a piece of malware which was found present on the Android Market. Now it appears that a new, stripped down DroidDream is appearing in the market, and has affected tens of apps from no less than 6 developers. Google has removed the apps from the market, but we aren't sure if they've used their kill switch to nuke the apps from any phones that have downloaded them at this time.

Google Nabs more Exploits from the MarketPlace

The latest battle in the war against malicious apps is joined as Google has reported via it's mobile blog that a number of new Android Apps repackaged with malware have been removed. In addition to wiping the apps from the Marketplace, Google is in the process of removing the malicious applications via remote from affected handsets. They've also banned the suspect publishers and are calling in the long arm of the law. According to Google, the malicious applications are taking advantage of a known vulnerability in Android versions 2.1 and below, so users with handsets running Android 2.2 (Froyo) and above aren't affected.

Android Malware Apps get official attention …

Recently there's been some concern about malware in the Android Marketplace. Hackers have been repackaging legitimate Android applications with spyware embedded and resubmitting them, causing mobile devices to be infected with malware after download. Here's some official words from Linda Liu, Global Marketing Director of the mobile security firm NetQin, on the steps Google is taking to combat the trend:
Recently, a new spyware named "DroidDream" causing privacy leakage was found on Google's Android Market. The spyware was embedded in repackaged legitimate applications and uploaded to the Android Market by the developers "Myournet", "Kingmall2010" and "we20090202". Mobile devices will be infected after download. Google has removed more than 50 infected applications from Android Market and remote deleted the infected apps downloaded to the users' devices to prevent further spreading of the malware. Even though Google has taken a series of control measures in the wake of the event, there seems to be a need for more to be done.
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