malware

Spyware found in Japanese Google Play Store

Ho boy. It seems that at Android enthusiast can't get his head down before yet another malware story slides across his writing desk. This time it's from Japan, where a researcher employed by McCafee found naughty apps in the regional Google Play Store sending private information to a remote server. Carlos Castillo documented his work on McAfee's website. The apps in question are the usual low-quality, generally useless fare, promising video players, anime and sexual content, which they only deliver after stealing personal information. Good grief, they could at least have the decency to engage in some good-old-fashioned piracy while they're at it.

Fake Angry Birds Space app is a trojan in disguise

Angry Birds Space is a lot of fun. No, really, it justifies the hype - if you haven't tried it yet, download the free game in the Google Play Store. But for Pete's sake, make sure you're using the Google Play Store: a fake app is unsurprisingly masquerading as the ultra-popular mobile game to add Android phones and tablets to its network of infected devices, remotely downloading more malicious apps and displaying ads. Security researchers at Sophos spotted the fake app in third-party app stores, but says that the official Rovio files are not affected.

Security concept app steals Android info with no permissions

Android security nuts, get your tin foil hats ready. A security researcher at Leviathan Security Group has posted a proof of concept application that can steal massive amounts of personal data when installed on an Android phone or tablet. No big deal, right? We've known about this sort of thing for ages. Except that Paul Brodeur's app can grab a shocking amount of data with zero Android system permissions, something that isn't supposed to be possible. The security loopholes exist in both Gingerbread and Ice Cream Sandwich, and can be presumed for other versions of Android as well.

Malware apps spread through Facebook to bypass Bouncer

After some pretty poor publicity surrounding the security of the Android Market, Google introduced the Bouncer scanning system for a more effective means of securing incoming apps. Of course, that doesn't account for the ignorance of some Android users, which at least one malware distributor is taking advantage of... and using Facebook as an alternate delivery mechanism.  As a method of getting around the Android Market, it's actually kind of ingenious - in a sneaky sort of way, of course.

Google’s “Bouncer” may not protect us from all Android malware

We're not going to lie, when Google introduced its "Bouncer" solution to the malware problem evident in the Android Market - it was comforting to know they would take antivirus protection into their own hands. Well, it seems that may not make a lick of difference for some rare cases. Professor Xuxian Jiang at North Carolina State University have recently found a new form of malware threatening Android's security.

Google Introduces “Bouncer” for Android Market, keeps us safe and malware free

In the recent months the amount of malware in the Android Market has continued to climb, or the reports have at least. When something gets as big and popular as Android you will always have those people looking to cheat, steal, and attack anything they can. Today Google has announced their plans and system to curb all of that. They are calling it the Android Market Bouncer -- like that guy in a suit standing by the door.

Symantec backs off of Android malware claims after researchers cry foul

Last week Symantec made a splash by declaring that somewhere between 1 and 5 million Android users were infected with the Android.Counterclank software, classifying it as a Trojan and declaring it malware. Almost immediately skeptics questioned the validity of Symantec's conclusions, notably competing security vendor Lookout Mobile. Lookout declared that while the 13 apps were questionable from a privacy standpoint, the Android.Counterclank API used within was aggressive adware, not malware.  Yesterday Symantec retracted their original claims in a blog post, noting that while the advertising in question is aggressive, it doesn't meet the definition of "malicious".

Lookout Mobile claims Android.Counterclank is adware, not malware

Last week Symantec made headlines, claiming that somewhere between 1 million and 5 million Android users had been infected with a particular kind of malware identified as Android.Counterclank. In an alarming blog post, the security software retailer notes Android.Counterclank's overly broad permissions and ability to send personal data through a network connection. Now rival security software vendor Lookout Mobile Security claims that Symantec's post was overblown, and that the code executing in the 13 apps identified is overly aggressive adware, not malware.

Symantec: millions of Android devices infected from Market downloads

If you're waiting for a wake-up call when it comes to Android malware, this might be it. Security software vendor Symantec has published a report claiming that anywhere from one to five million Android phones and tablets may be infected with the Android.Counterclank spyware. The infections spread from thirteen identified apps across three developers, some of which have already been removed from the Android Market, presumably by Google. Most were blatant copies of popular games or vaguely naughty apps.

Comodo Mobile Security now available in Android Market

There's a lot of growth in the anti-malware space for Android at the moment, and yet another well-known company is joining the fray. Comodo, maker of the well-known Comodo Firewall and other security software for Windows, has published Comodo Mobile Security  Free AV in the Android Market. The app includes a standard antivirus function and process manager, as well as call and SMS blocking and locking functions for individual apps. Surprisingly, all this functionality is included for free.
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