malware

Lookout offers Stagefright Detector for Android devices

While Google still hasn’t officially released the crucial security patch (aside from the one for Nexus devices) that would protect Android devices from the so-called Stagefright malware, there have been several posts and advice on how to at least try and protect your smartphone from being infected. Lookout, which previously posted a blog on how to disable MMS auto-fetch is now offering a free app that would tell you if your gadget is vulnerable or already affected and then give you advice on what to do.

Samsung to implement new security update process with partners

In light of the Android Stagefright security vulnerability that has frightened users everywhere, as well as Google’s slow response in issuing a security patch to resolve the issue, Samsung has decided that a new security update process needs to be in place. Working with carriers and partners rather than pushing the update directly to consumers has both its advantages and disadvantages, but when it comes to mobile security, there should only be a short waiting period.

Protect Android devices from Stagefright by disabling MMS auto-fetch

Android users had a rude awakening earlier this week when news of the Stagefright vulnerability spread like wildfire across online news outlets. And unlike previous hoaxes or paranoid false alarms, this one is actually legit and should cause worry for those running Froyo up to Lollipop, which is basically 95% of devices now. But while Google still hasn’t given a patch fix to carriers and OEMs, we need to start protecting our devices from this devious hack. Lookout has one easy suggestion: disable your device’s MMS auto-fetch.

Developer for malware app settles out of court with FTC, New Jersey

You really have to be careful nowadays with apps that are promising various rewards and bonuses (and if they don't come from reliable developers). Chances are, they are either a fraudulent company or they will be unleashing a malware on your device that will eat up your battery or memory or worse, it might actually steal something from you. The developer of one such app decided to settle out of court with the Federal Trade Commission and the New Jersey government, and now they will never be able to create similar apps ever again.

Your phone may be exposed to ‘Android Installer Hijacking’

In an open ecosystem like Android OS, bugs and malware will continue to exist, as long as there is precious personal data to mine and people with malicious intent to take advantage of the security holes in the OS. Palo Alto Network’s Unit 42 has just released an announcement of what a vulnerability it calls “Android Installer Hijacking”, which may be present in almost half of Android devices out there.

Xiaomi proves that tested ‘Mi 4’ was fake, Bluebox agrees

Bluebox Labs, a research outfit that tests security on mobile devices, recently put out some information pertaining to a specific Xiaomi Mi 4 smartphone that they tested and found out that it was riddled with malware, was using a version of Android that was vulnerable to hacking, and basically failed at all the security tests they made. Xiaomi, in their defense, has been very prompt and open about verifying the information. In the end, they all agreed that the tested unit was a counterfeit.

Xiaomi Mi 4 hit with ‘questionable security’ accusation again

Bluebox, a software security company that tests mobile devices for security and malware threat, got their hands on a Xiaomi Mi 4 for testing. The results were not good. Bluebox claims that there were malicious software installed on the device, with some of those even mimicking Google applications. Xiaomi has since replied to the accusation, but it still leaves questions on the security of the phone and the integrity of the brand itself.

Turning off your smartphone won’t save you from this spyware

There might come a time when we get so frustrated or so scared of malware threats that we just give up and turn off our phones in exaspertion. There might be a case, however, where even that won't be enough to protect you. Security software makers AVG just released a report revealing a new kind of malware that attacks Android devices even while they're turned off. Or to be more precise, it just makes it look like you've turned off your device already when, it truth, it could still be phoning home.

Malware infected about 16 million mobile devices last year

Not that we don't know this one yet but millions of mobile devices have been infected by malware last year. According Alcatel-Lucent, a French telecommunications equipment company, malware affected about 16 million gadgets in 2014. The figure saw a 25 percent increase compared to the previous year. Mobile devices' malware infection rate is still at 0.68 perfect but mobile spyware is on the rise.
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