magazines

Limited edition Entertainment Weekly magazine totes Android display

Who says print media is dead? Entertainment Weekly has put out a limited edition version of their magazine that features a functioning Android smartphone embedded in one of the pages, as reported by our friends at SlashGear. Let that sink in for a second; an Android device embedded in a magazine. It sounds like something out of a scifi movie. The device has a 2.3-inch screen that displays commercials for upcoming CW TV shows. Commercials cover upcoming shows such as The Arrow and Emily Owens, M.D. After a couple of ads, it links to a live version of CW’s Twitter page. That means the device is connected the Internet at all times, and upon taking the device apart, it turns out there is a T-Mobile sim card installed. As far as the insides of the device, it is appears to be a gutted ABO 810, a budget smartphone running Android 2.2 FroYo. If a user were to go and buy a similar device it would set them back around $40. The device is chargeable and can be tinkered with by more adventurous users. Clearly, this ad is working. Android Community and almost every tech site on the Internet is talking about it, which is clearly brining CW the attention the ad is seeking. Does this mean we will see more ads like this in magazines? Probably. [gallery] [via Mashable]

Gamefly’s GameQ magazine app now available

If you don't know what Gamefly is, think "Netflix for video games" and you've got it right away. Like some game stores, Gamefly has launched its own gaming publication, which it's calling GameQ. Stop me if I'm going too fast for you. The magazine is available in digital format as an Android app, and it's a free download even for those who don't subscribe to the service.

Next Issue magazine app review

The idea of reading periodicals on a tablet-like device is in fact older than the current crop of tablets. But the reality has thus far left something to be desired, mostly because translating an essentially analog experience to the digital world is a major UI feat. Dealing with content that seamlessly integrates text and photos is a lot more difficult than simple words. The latest company to have a go is Next Issue Media, and they've got some of the biggest magazine publishers in the US behind them: Hearst, Meredith, News Corp, Time Inc and Condé Nast. The format and pricing of the Next Issue service present a compelling front, so we decided it deserved a full review.

Google Currents goes international – gets huge speed increase and offline reading

The beautiful and free magazine reader Google Currents was just updated today by Google bringing some much needed changes, not to mention international availability and support for over 44 languages. Being released back in December users have been patiently waiting for an update and additional support and today they killed two birds (or more) with one stone and have released a massive update.

The Economist app comes to Android

If you are a fan of reading on your Android device, you have one more popular magazine offering its content in a digital app to choose from. The Economist has announced that it now has its app available for Android devices. The Android app comes after the iOS app proved to be so popular with 2.4 million downloads according to the publication.
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