legal

OnePlus ends legal battles in India, Cyanogen to continue support

If you remember last year, China-based smartphone manufacturer OnePlus got itself into a sticky situation with primary software partner Cyanogen over business actions in the sub-continent of India. As you may know, India is one of the fastest growing smartphone markets in the world, and everybody wants a piece of the pie – even Cyanogen and OnePlus. The year of 2014 ended with OnePlus and Cyanogen, plus Cyanogen’s India-based partner Micromaxx, in a legal scuffle. OnePlus just released what seems like good news today that their legal troubles in India are over.

Judge dismisses AT&T claim that FTC can’t sue them for data throttling

October last year, the Federal Trade Commission filed in federal court lawsuit against AT&T for data throttling. According to the FTC, the carrier deceived consumers by offering unlimited data plans and throttling speeds. Allegedly, AT&T was controlling the network speed once the 3GB or 5GB limit was reached. AT&T was then quick to respond by saying FTC can't sue them because they were just a common carrier and there was an exception.

FCC prohibits WiFi-blocking of hotels, says this practice illegal

We're aware that some hotels and companies are blocking the WiFi hotspots of guestS. That is a bad practice and according to the FCC, it's ILLEGAL. One of the most controversial issues which actually led to FCC issuing a special warning was that of Marriot's WiFi-blocking efforts. FCC officially released what is called an "FCC Enforcement Advisory" that says jamming other people's WiFi hotspots is not acceptable. This practice must be stopped immediately.

Cyanogen’s Steve Kondik chimes in on OnePlus, Micromax row

Although India seems to be quickly becoming the new darling of the mobile industry after China, it isn't without its own share of controversy. So far the latest and biggest involves Indian OEM Micromax and Chinese startup OnePlus and it all revolves around the software provided by Cyanogen, Inc. While our limited outsider perspective would have us assign roles of villain and victim in this drama, things are, as always, not as clear cut. CyanogenMod founder Steve Kondik gives a few insights into some of the things that have happened behind the scenes.

OnePlus and Cyanogen go head-to-head in India

When in a span of a month, you see Cyanogen make an exclusive agreement with Indian retailer Micromax, and then you see OnePlus break their exclusive “invite only” purchasing process to launch a new purchasing avenue for the Indian market, you know there was something big brewing. To put quite shortly, it looks like OP has been wronged, but because of a court decision – it looks like it won’t be able to continue selling the OnePlus One phone in India.

Micromax wins temporary injunction against Shenzhen OnePlus in India

A legal battle was fought recently in India with a Delhi high court granting Micromax Informatics Ltd a temporary injunction this week against Chinese smartphone maker Shenzhen OnePlus Technology Co Ltd. The court barred OnePlus from marketing, selling, and shipping OnePlus mobile phones in India that bear the Cyanogen mark.

India bans Xiaomi sales and imports for patent infringement

Xiaomi has been hit with a sales and import ban in India. A court in New Delhi has banned sales and imports due to copyright infringement. The case was brought against Xiaomi by Ericsson India and Ericsson says that it has tried to get Xiaomi to license the standard essential patents it is using in its devices.

FTC files complaint in federal court against AT&T for throttling

The FTC has filed a complaint against AT&T in federal court that alleges AT&T Mobility has misled millions of smartphone customers by charging them for so-called unlimited data plans while reducing data speeds. The FTC says that in some cases AT&T reduced data speeds by nearly 90%. AT&T failed to adequately disclose to customers on unlimited data plans that if they hit a certain amount of data use, speeds would be throttled according to the FTC complaint.
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