HUD

Project Glass UI still in flux says Google

Google's Project Glass demonstration video is the stuff of dreams, in both a literal and figurative sense. Speaking with CNET, a spokesperson admitted that the augmented reality, full vision overlay seen in the project's most visible demonstration thus far isn't quite what the real thing looks like. It's being described as floating "above" the user's line of vision, about the same place where you'd normally see the edge of an umbrella or hat brim.

Epson Moverio BT-100 see-through Android video glasses available now

Do you love Android? Of course you do, you're reading this website. Do you love Android so much that you want to put in on your head and go around looking like an extra from Blade Runner? Have you got seven hundred dollars that you just don't know what to do with? Then Epson's Moverio BT-100 might be right up your alley. The video glasses include the standard micro-projection feature for a pair of virtual screens 80 inches in diameter, but interestingly, they're also semi-transparent, and allow the viewer to see what's in front of him or her while wearing them. On a bright day. Presumably with no one watching.

Google’s HUD glasses are still coming says NYT – sometime for some price

One of the more hush-hush projects from deep within the Google campus is reportedly a set of Android-powered heads-up display glasses, and they've been the talk of tech town for the last couple of months. Certain aspersions to Terminator were made, not to mention augmented reality. The New York Times was the original source for this rumor, and they've apparently got someone on the inside - but that someone seems to have an issue with specifics. The latest bit of news on the "Google Glasses" is that they'll come before the end of 2012, and at a price between $250 and $600 USD. Precision is our watchword, folks.

Google’s X team working on Terminator-style HUD glasses

"Wearable technology." These days, the phrase conjures up images of laughably impractical watch-phone hybrids, single function devices like the FitBit and gigantic head-mounted displays that are useless for anything but watching movies for about 20 minutes at a time. But information leaking out of the shadowy inner test labs known as Google X indicates that the company is working on nothing less than a personal Heads-Up Display (HUD), a staple of science fiction for decades, and the goal of many converging technologies like transparent screens and microscopic transistors.