html5

Amazon now allows Developers to charge for HTML5 web apps

As HTML5 fast becomes the standard for more things than just websites, monetization becomes a point of interest. With Google’s important move to bring HTML5 apps in the Play Store,  the move away from a web-only existence for HTML5 is rounding into shape. While HTML5 isn’t the silver bullet, it does provide a good avenue for development, and Amazon is making their App Store an attractive avenue for Developers to potentially strike gold.

Facebook hashtags rolling out to mobile, no word on Android app

A few weeks ago the folks from Facebook made a big move to finally add the popular hashtag option to their social network. Made popular (and extremely useful) by Twitter, we now finally have clickable #hashtags on Facebook. While the inclusion was nice, we still weren't able to enjoy the feature on mobile. With millions of users enjoying Facebook on mobile daily, this only made sense, and as of Thursday the feature is rolling out to all devices.

TeleNav unveils web-based HTML 5 navigation for apps and more

The popular third party location-based navigation and provider TeleNav has just unveiled the full details on their new HTML 5 powered and web-based navigation service. No longer will users need to download an app, or leave the app they are in for turn-by-turn navigation and directions. With Scout for Apps by TeleNav developers can add simple voice-guided navigation services directly into any application, or web site.

Google Swiffy May Solve Future Mobile Flash Support

Google Swiffy Beta is a tool used to help developers convert their Adobe Flash content to HTML5. When Adobe finally decided to pull out from the mobile scene, we all wondered how Flash updates (if any at all) would hit our devices. The ability to play Flash content on cutting edge mobile devices is important for a complete browsing experience, and at the rate Android OS is growing and evolving, Flash compatibility is a must.

Amazon ignores Android with new Kindle Cloud Reader web-app

Amazon has launched a new web-based Kindle app, http://read.amazon.com/, using HTML5 to offer the ereading experience within the browser. However, while the app appears to be a workaround to avoid Apple's limitations on native iOS apps containing links to external stores, it seems Amazon is also leaving Android out in the cold. Attempt to access the Kindle Cloud Reader on an Android Honeycomb tablet, and you'll get the message "Your web browser isn't supported yet" and the advice to download Chrome or Safari (the desktop versions) instead. We tried in both the native Honeycomb browser and third-party alternative Opera, with no luck in either. It's a shame, since the web app is surprisingly well put together. As well as offering access to the cloud store of previously purchased titles, which can be locally downloaded to an iPad for offline reading, it has seamless integration with Amazon's Kindle store for buying new titles. The decision not to get the app up to speed with Android is somewhat curious, since Amazon is believed to have a pair of Android-based tablets of its own in the works. The company's native Android app still supports the Kindle store - Google, unlike Apple, doesn't limit links to places people can buy content - however.