hacks

Dell Streak gets unofficial Froyo 2.2 ROM [Video]

Dell's Streak tablet has seen its Android 2.1 update - in certain regions, anyway - but how about Android 2.2 Froyo for the 5-inch slate?  It's not an official update, instead being a port of a vanilla CyanogenMod ROM that's been fettled by Stephen Hyde (aka DJ_Steve), but it's a way to get the latest version of Android on your Streak with no delay. There are a few hiccups with this particular build, including the occasional random reboot, and the installation process isn't exactly a walk in the park, but the end result is Froyo on the Streak and well in advance of any official Dell option.  Anyone brave enough to try it out? [youtube 4GNEsUrE2Hw] [via StreakSmart]

Droidrover uses Nexus One to control NASA rover [Video]

We love Android, we love remote-control toys, and so this Droidrover project presses all the right buttons.  You can't really describe it as a toy, though; it's actually the handiwork of several of the team at NASA Ames Research. Basically, they're remotely-controlling a Senseta rover from a Google Nexus One, with an Arduino and Bluetooth in-between.  The Arduino and Android pairing apparently makes for a much smaller controller bundle, which in turn means the rover is lighter, more manoeuvrable and uses less power.  It's also a reasonably priced alternative; including a Nexus One, it all came to under $600 (though that doesn't include the rover itself). [youtube XxhBE7ghcxk] [Thanks mdNomad!]

Samsung Galaxy Tab is Rooted For Now, Before Release

The Galaxy Tab, the tablet device from Samsung in the lineage of the Galaxy S devices, isn't officially released yet. Yes, it's announced, but it's not widely available anywhere, but that's not stopping the development crowd. As has happened with a few high-profile devices out there before this, the Galaxy Tab has officially been rooted, well before its official release into the wild.

Nokia N900 gets Android 2.2: calling, data, more [Video]

Work to put Android onto the Nokia N900 - more commonly found running the company's own open-source OS, Maemo - has already resulted in a few experimental ROMs, but now the NITDroid project reckons they've got something almost stable enough for everyday use.  Their latest release adds in voice call functionality, which most people would consider pretty important for their cellphone. Incoming and outgoing calls are supported, as are various forms of data connection, and the whole thing is based on Android 2.2 Froyo which means it's actually potentially running a version of the OS better than the actual Android device many people are living with now.  All of the Google apps are supported, and of course there's the N900's hardware keyboard to think about too.  Most frustrating, though, is the apparent absence of camera support, since the N900's optics are pretty darn good.  Still, you can download and have a play here. [youtube jVpgqTF89zU] [via Engadget]

Samsung Galaxy S unlock hack is easiest to date

Samsung's Galaxy S series may be relatively special in the US for being a smartphone launched - in various identikit forms - across multiple carriers at the same time, but what if you want to use your AT&T Captivate on T-Mobile USA's network?  Happily Samsung seem to almost be conspiring against their carrier partners by apparently including unlock codes for the Galaxy S series in files actually on the smartphones themselves. The clever souls over at xda-developers have come up with a tool to extract said-codes from the .BAK files in which they lurk, and have put together a full guide on how to use it.  Since you don't need to root the Galaxy S in order to unlock it, and there's also a relock system, you can even restore the phone to as-delivered condition should you need to send it back to your respective carrier. As ever, doing any modifications of this sort leaves you facing the risk of a bricked handset, but so far reports on the process seem positive.  It works on both the US versions of the Galaxy S - e.g. the T-Mobile Vibrant and AT&T Captivate - as well as the European Galaxy S model. [via TechTicker]

Motorola Droid X Now Features Clockwork Recovery

One feature that wasn't listed with the Droid X, was Clockwork Recovery. Why? Because Motorola doesn't want you to root your phone and do whatever you want to it. They went as far as to add that pesky eFuse aspect, and ever since, folks have been wondering if the Droid X would ever, ever be able to feature custom ROMs. Well, thanks to ridiculously talented developer Koush, we can safely say that the device is one giant leap closer.

HTC HD2 gets functional Froyo ROM [Video]

Last we saw of the efforts to get Android 2.2 Froyo running on the HTC HD2, the Google OS would load but there were some potentially deal-breaking 3G and audio issues.  Happily the xda-developers community never sleeps, and now a new ROM release delivers what looks to be a 99-percent complete Froyo experience for the HD2. HDBlog.it shot a video demo of the new ROM in action, complete with a Minimal Matte skin that provides a neatly different user experience not only to the HD2's original Windows Mobile 6.5.3 OS but what you'll find on true HTC Android handsets.  WiFi, GPS, Bluetooth (aside from the HID profile), 3G, the camera (including flash) and most other things are functional, so this sounds like a ROM you could actually comfortably live with day to day. [youtube 0raobiKRDAs]

Samsung Vibrant: How to Tether Without Root [Video]

One of the best reasons to root your Android device, is to get your hands on some wired and wireless tethering options. It's one of the greatest features of Android, and probably why all the carriers out there want to charge us for it (we're lookin' at you, Verizon). But, that's not stopping Samsung from giving the option right from their own software, and some ingenious individuals out there from finding out how to actually use it.

DROID X rooted; next stop that tricky bootloader

Could it really be this simple?  According to Droid X Forums the new Verizon DROID X has already been rooted, and it's a mighty simple process from the look of it.  Hot on the heals of recovery mode for the smartphone being accessed come root privileges. Of course, just having root access is only one part of the process: right now the bootloader is still locked down tight, and Motorola's use of eFuse tech means that third-party ROMs are still a no-go area right now.  What you should be able to do, though, is get rid of any preloaded bloatware you're not using, and all the other little hacks that root permits.  Now, anyone brave enough to give it a try?
Step 1: Set up ADB Step 2: Push exploid to /sqlite_stmt_journals "adb push exploid /sqlite_stmt_journals" Step 3: type "adb shell" Step 4: type "cd sqlite_stmt_journals" Step 5: type "chmod 755 exploid" Step 6: type "./exploid" and follow directions on screen Step 7: type "rootshell" Step 8: type in password "secretlol" Step 9: your in root! Step 10: mount your sdcard to pc and put Superuser.apk and su in the sdcard Step 11: unmount sdcard Step 12: in adb (make sure your still in root with the # sign) type in: - cp /sdcard/Superuser.apk /system/app/Superuser.apk - cp /sdcard/su /system/bin/su - chmod 4755 /system/bin/su
[Thanks djunio and ggrant3876!]
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