hacks

ClockworkMod Superuser app released as an open-source beta

Koushik Dutta has released his latest app. We suspect many will be familiar with that name, he is associated with ClockworkMod and also recently released Carbon. On Carbon, he is responsible for the backup app, not the Twitter app. We can put that bit aside though because this latest app deals with the ClockworkMod side. The app is called ClockworkMod Superuser and it has been released as beta 0.

Nexus S Beats Out Dual-Core Devices for Top Spot in Performance Benchmarks with Trinity and CM7

Behold, the once and still king of numbers, Nexus S. The following winning spots have been achieved by our very own forum manager Simms22 and are achieved by combining a Samsung Nexus S device with the latest version of CyanogenMod 7 and the kernel currently known as Trinity 1.544Ghz. What this kernel has done in combination with CyanogenMod 7 is bump the effectiveness of the Nexus S, a phone that, mind you, only has a single core, up to benchmarks that are beyond even the greatest dual-core scores of today. This is big business, and if I do say so myself, chip manufacturers need to put their game faces on and start steppin.

Galaxy S II gets root-friendly insecure boot ROM

The Samsung Galaxy S II has only been on the market for a short while - and units are still in high demand - but we've already seen one of the first hacks of the smartphone. MoDaCo's Paul O'Brien has come up with a custom GSII insecure boot image that allows for adb shell root and adb remount. The ROM itself doesn't actually root the Galaxy S II, but it will allow owners to push the su binary and Superuser APK required for root. It also disables the flash-recovery script, replacing it with a call to /data/local/custom-scripting.sh. It's not the first root - one method was released at the tail end of April - but we're definitely excited to see more modders turn their attention to the Galaxy S II. While the phone itself impressed us in our review, we also saw plenty of potential as a platform for custom ROMs.

T-Mobile Sidekick 4G root already discovered

The T-Mobile Sidekick 4G has only been on sale since Wednesday, but that hasn't slowed down the rooting masters at xda-developers. They've already come up with a root for the messaging-centric smartphone, opening the door to custom ROMs and other juicy hacks. The root is the handiwork of "josby", but according to other xda members there are several ways to hack the Sidekick 4G. Next up is stripping away some of the preinstalled apps T-Mobile load onto the handset, which may give it an extra turn of speed. We found the Sidekick to be something of a unique proposition among Android devices, doing a darn good job of following in the footsteps of its unusual predecessors and differentiating itself for a pretty specific market. More on the Sidekick 4G in the full Android Community review. [Thanks Kenny!]
1) enable debug USB mode on your phone 2) install Samsung drivers for the phone - right now Samsung's site seems to not have a choice for the Sidekick 4G's model (SGH-T839), but I grabbed the drivers for the Vibrant (at www .samsung.com/us/support/downloads/SGH-T959ZKDTMB) and they worked. 3) get adb shell working on your PC (Google it) 4) download the rageagainstthecage-arm5.bin and Superuser packages from the links in this page: wiki.cyanogenmod.com/index.php?title=HTC_Hero_%28CDMA%29:_Full_Update_G uide (be sure to unzip the files into the directory where your adb.exe program is unless you've put it in your path) 5) reboot your phone and plug it in 6) adb push rageagainstthecage-arm5.bin /data/local/tmp 7) adb shell 8) cd /data/local/tmp 9) chmod 755 rageagainstthecage-arm5.bin 10) ./rageagainstthecage-arm5.bin 11) wait until you get booted back out to your DOS command prompt 12) adb kill-server 13) adb start-server 14) adb shell 15) you should now be at a # prompt. The first few times I tried, I wasn't - I was at $. Doing this from a fresh boot seemed to be the trick. Reboot your phone and try again if you're getting a $. 16) mount -o remount,rw /dev/block/stl9 /system 17) exit 18) adb push su /system/xbin 19) adb shell chmod 4755 /system/xbin/su 20) adb push Superuser.apk /system/app 21) adb shell mount -o remount,ro /dev/block/stl9 /system 22) exit 23) reboot the phone then run an app that requests root, such as Root Explorer, to verify

IOIO for Android detailed: Project samples from USB breakout board [Video]

We mentioned SparkFun's brilliant new IOIO for Android earlier this week, a USB I/O breakout board for Android smartphones which turns your handset into a super-Arduino of sorts. Now the brains behind the board, Ytai, has spilled the beans on the project, including some sample code and a handful of ideas that you can use IOIO to create. For instance, there's the Retroid, a smart alarm clock which can be told to make different ringing patterns and show various LEDs depending on incoming calls, messages and other events on the handset. Or the Visual Charger, a huge multi-segment LED power indicator which gives an at-a-glance idea of what percentage the smartphone's battery is at. [youtube 8sAvXCfEj3s] We prefer the Wall Printer, though, which uses seven Sharpie-style market pens hooked up to servos for an old-school printer effect controlled by an Android phone. Definitely worth considering if you're into Android and electronics; you can pre-order the IOIO for Android here, for $49.95. [youtube aYUMYyXBaF0] [via Twitter]

SparkFun IOIO for Android makes Arduino-style hacks simple

If you're familiar with the Arduino then SparkFun's new IOIO for Android should get you really excited. A straightforward way to get I/O from an Android 1.5+ device's USB connection, the IOIO board uses a simple Java API to hook into your app and then allows you to link external sensors, inputs and other controls with your own software and the capabilities of the Android device itself. Among the connectivity choices are Digital Input/Output, PWM, Analog Input, I2C, SPI and UARTcontrol. SparkFun have tested it with the T-Mobile G1, Google Nexus One and Nexus S, and Motorola's Droid X (along with an unspecified tablet) but it should play nicely with other Android devices too. The firmware is all open-source and no modifications are necessary to the handset itself, so you shouldn't impact your warranty. It's available for pre-order now, priced at $49.95. [via Twitter]

Verizon and Sprint Galaxy Tab now sub-$200 as homebrew Honeycomb attempts continue

Sprint and Verizon have slashed pricing for the Samsung Galaxy Tab, with both carriers now asking $199.99 for the 7-inch tablet. The extra discounting makes the CDMA networks the cheapest in the US for picking up the Galaxy Tab; T-Mobile USA is asking $249.99, while AT&T offers the Tab agreement-free for $549.99. The move could well be a push to clear out Galaxy Tab stock ahead of the new range of Android 3.0 Honeycomb tablets that are expected over the coming weeks and months. Samsung is yet to confirm whether the Galaxy Tab will get Honeycomb or remain on Android 2.2 Froyo as it launched with. That hasn't stopped the third-party hacking community from attempting to do what Samsung seems reluctant to attempt; xda-developers already have a rudimentary Honeycomb ROM for the CDMA version of the Galaxy Tab [via The Unlockr]. However it's still lacking in most of the day-to-day functionality most users would require.

Sony Ericsson XPERIA X10 gets Gingerbread courtesy of Arc

Sony Ericsson may have abandoned Android OS update plans for the XPERIA X10, but that doesn't mean the modding community is done with the smartphone. Over at xda-developers, TripNRaVeR has fashioned nothing less than Android 2.3 Gingerbread for the X10, based on the version running on the XPERIA Arc. So far, the list of what's working far outnumbers what isn't, though the ROM download is currently offline so that sound support can be added in. Still, network, data, WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS and Sony Ericsson's Timescape all work as expected.

Motorola XOOM Unlocked for Flashing by TheFredElement

First of all, we must do the customary compliment on the username. There clearly isn't much better an element than the Fred element. Then, let's have at it- unlocking the Motorola XOOM like we said you could, truthfully quite the easy task. They didn't make this machine to stop you from doing so, but doing so will VOID your warranty. Keep that in mind. Another good thing to keep in mind is that the following method will ERASE your tablet.

Android 3.0 Honeycomb hits Nexus One in unofficial port

It'll be Thursday before the first official taste of Honeycomb hits the market - in the shape of the Android 3.0 powered Motorola XOOM - but the quest to put the tablet SDK on all manner of other devices continues with the Nexus One. Google's first Nexus phone has been married up with Honeycomb by the skilled tinkerers at xda-developers, rooted and given a quick tweak to make sure the display works in landscape and that the app drawer is functional. Unfortunately, there's a lot more broken than working right now, so you probably don't want this as your everyday OS. Phone, WiFi, the accelerometer, sound, the camera, Bluetooth and 3D acceleration aren't functional, but if you've been wondering how a tablet-centric OS will look on a 3.7-inch display, now's your chance. [gallery] [via Geekword]
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