hack

Android netbook gets video demo

We've seen netbooks running Android before, but they're still rare enough to prod our curiosity.  Over at NetbookNews they've been playing with an i-Buddie netbook that's been loaded with Google's open-source OS, and the Atom N270-based ultraportable certainly runs Android. It can't exactly be said to run it smoothly, however, with numerous error messages popping up throughout the demo.  It's unclear exactly whether this is of i-Buddie's doing or something the NetbookNews team have attempted themselves; we're thinking it's the latter. While the end result does look a little like a smartphone stretched to unwieldy lengths across a 10-inch display, don't underestimate Android's potential for netbooks.  According to the latest rumors, ODM manufacturer Compal is already ramping up for Android netbook production this year, while Intel are preparing to support the OS with their mobile processors. [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFnqwdIqEW0[/youtube]

Multitouch hack for T-Mobile G1: Video Demo

While the hardware of the T-Mobile G1 can support multitouch, and the users certainly could deal with it, neither HTC nor Google themselves gave the smartphone the ability to recognize more than one simultaneous touch.  Now that's all changed, thanks to coder Luke Hutchison, who has put together a multitouch hack for the G1.  As you can see in the video demo, the hack adds pinch & spread zooming to the G1's browser, together with maps support, replacing the usual zoom controls. Right now this is more a proof-of-concept than anything else, though it's usable, and needs OpenGL acceleration support and kinetic scrolling (where the page continues scrolling after you "flick" it) before it will go as smoothly as multitouch on the Apple iPhone is.  Installation is not for the faint-hearted, either, requiring a reflash of the G1's hardware and the potential risk of bricking your smartphone. If you're brave, the full instructions are here.  The hacked apps - Browser and MapViewer - also include accelerometer-linked screen rotation, so you can use them in landscape mode without needing to flick out the keyboard.  There's also a photo browser with multitouch support. [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ZEshnuQcno[/youtube] [Thanks Simon!]

Android Community Week in Review – Week 1 2009

We started the week off with a hardware hack that allows users to use the T-Mobile G1 with an iPod dock and speakers. Though this hack is not pretty and only somewhat useful, it is very interesting and really gives the iPod the good old one two. Open source developers who prefer using Python to Java can now rejoice as Damon over at damonkohler.com has managed to get it running on his G1. As most projects are in the first stages this is still a little rough, but it does show great promise with future development. More photos of the OpenMoko FreeRunner running Android have surfaced. Nothing new or exciting to report here. ShopSavvy needs your help to win the Crunchies 2008 Best Mobile App award. Voting only takes a few seconds and two clicks of the mouse. Please help Big In Japan win the award for creating such an amazing application. Google has sent out an email to those registered as developers informing them that paid applications will indeed be available in mid January. So grab the free applications while you can. HTC has a firm belief that the cupcake update will become legitimately available through Google in time. HTC has no say while Google and T-Mobile are in full control of what is included in the update. Right now Google and T-Mobile are declining to comment on such a statement. The guys over at VentureBeat have managed to get Android running on the Eee PC 1000 netbook. Though there are still a few issues with the port, they say that the process was fairly easy. There were a few other discoveries made while digging through the source code. The RC29 firmware has made its way to the Internet and now users who upgraded to the RC30 firmware and lost root access can now regain it. The process is fairly easy to do and has been confirmed to work. As with all firmware updates we advise you to proceed with caution.

Regain root access of your G1 with leaked RC29 firmware

How many of you upgraded your T-Mobile G1 to the RC30 firmware only to find that you no longer had root access?  A member by the name of “chavonbravo over at the XDA-developers forum has gotten his hands on the uploaded image for the RC29 firmware. The process is quite simple, simply rename the file, copy it over to your microSD card, and run through the standard procedure for re0flashing your G1. This method has been tested and does indeed work but proceed with caution, as with all firmware hacking of any kind there are risks involved. Good luck to all those who are going to revert to a much easier hackable firmware. With this new method out there, how many of you are now going to slave away trying to regain control of your handset?

Small hack makes the iPod docks compatible with T-Mobile G1

In an effort to at least show that the iPhone has nothing on the T-Mobile G1, someone has found a way t make the G1 work with an iPhone/iPod Touch dock. This hack may not be what you expect or anything to look at really, but it does show that this is in fact possible. The easily recognized iPod dock connector has a very well known pinout so the process was not too hard to figure out.  To figure out the pinout of the HTC USB connector he just split open the hands free adapter he got with his T-Mobile Dash. Below is the process outlined to create this converter.
Most of the wires were labeled, “L” “R” “M” ect. It took a bit of fiddling to discover that connecting pin 7 to the audio ground ( pin 8 ) turns on the external audio. Sparkfun sells 30 awg (Gauge) wire wrap wire that is perfect for soldering to the ultra tiny pins on both the HTC ExtUSB connector and the iPod Female connector. We used pins 1, 2, 3, 4, 16, and 23 on the iPod Female connector. If you gently bend the pins out it makes it much easier to solder, but be careful the pins break easy. 1 & 2 are Ground - 3 is Right Audio + 4 is Left Audio + 16 is USB Ground - 23 is USB Power +5 It is important that you do not mix the audio and power grounds or you can get a nasty hum. On the G1 side of things the upper half of the connector is a standard mini-usb pinout, the bottom is very different. We used Pins 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 10. 1 is USB Power +5v in 5 is USB Ground - 6 is Left Audio + 7 is marked “AG” on the T-Mobile Dash headset board, connect this one to pin 8 to enable audio. 8 is Audio Ground - 10 is Right Audio + Now we wire the two connectors together like so: iPod pin - HTC ExtUSB pin 1 ———— 8 3 ———— 10 4 ———— 6 16 ———— 5 23 ———— 1 Don’t forget to solder together pins 1 & 2 on the iPod side and pins 7 & 8 on the G1 side. When its done it looks like this: droid-dock So we have audio from Audio player and YouTube, and the speaker dock charges the G1 too. Have fun!
[Via Webnetta]

Turn your regular T-Mobile G1 into a developers edition

Those of us who already have a T-Mobile G1 or do not have the money for the developers edition and would like to have one, will love what we found. The bootloader for the developers edition G1 is finally out and is making its rounds. From what we hear, T-Mobile went ahead and gave a developers version of the G1 to a customer as a warranty replacement. With a little help from his friends, he managed to extract the unlocked bootloader from the phone and put it on the Internet. The best part is the process of converting your G1 is very simple. To start, just gain root access to your T-Mobile G1. Once you have done that all you have to do is download and apply the unlocked bootloader to your handset. Just turn on your phone while holding down the power and camera button and you will see the skateboarding Android instead of the usually boot screen.  Congratulations you now have a developers T-mobile G1. Be warned though that this may also brick your phone and we here at Android Community hold no responsibility for any damage this process may do to your T-Mobile G1. If this process is done wrong at all, YOUR PHONE WILL BE DEAD. With that said we would like to know how this process worked for you. [Via GotOnTheInter]

Much needed garage door opener hack becomes available for forgetful people

Now that developers are pushing out the first wave of hacks we are seeing ideas and concepts that are amazing. The latest hack that we have stumbled upon is the garage door opener. Now you can program your G1 to open your garage when you don’t have you real garage door opener. Brad Fitzpatric has managed to bring the T-Mobile G1 more use in no time at all. As far as we know you wont be seeing this “hack” in the Android Market. Every time we see a new hack it is always bigger and better, we just can’t wait to see what will be next. The one hack we are still waiting for is the ability to remotely control your PC through the G1. “I got it all working. I now have an Android Activity (GarageDoorActivity) which interacts with an Android Service I wrote (InRangeService), letting me start and stop the service’s wifi scanning task. The service gets the system WifiManager, holds a WifiLock to keep the radio active, and then does a Wifi scan every couple seconds, looking for my house. When my house is in range, it does the magic HTTP request to my garage door opener’s webserver (HMAC-signed timestamped URL, for non-replayability/forgeability if sniffed) and my garage door opens. Complete with a bunch of fun Toast notifications (like Growl) and Android Notifications (both persistent ongoing notifications for background scanning, and one-time notifications for things like the garage door actually opening).” Brad has made the source code available as would anyone who truly supports the open source community, to anyone who wishes to give it a try. We must warn you it takes a little bit of work, this is not your standard point and click application download. We would love to hear reports and reviews for those of you who were able to get this to work. [Via Brad's Life]
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