hack

Samsung to fix keyboard vulnerability thru KNOX, firmware update

Yesterday, we were all shocked (and a little bit scared, just a little bit) to find out about a vulnerability in Samsung phones that hackers can take advantage off. This is specifically through the SwiftKey keyboard app that is pre-installed in over 600 million Samsung phones. Today both Samsung and SwiftKey have made statements dealing with this issue, although Samsung might not have been happy with SwiftKey’s response.

Samsung phones vulnerable to keyboard app hack, 600M affected

If you bought a Samsung phone within the last 2 or 3 years, chances are you need Samsung to plug a vulnerability found within the pre-installed keyboard from 3rd party developer SwiftKey. With this pre-installed keyboard found in almost all Samsung devices produced between 2012 and now, the number of phones with this vulnerability is expected to be around 600 million units. Yes, it’s that bad.

Woman files case against Google for unauthorized charges

Racking up hundreds to thousand of dollars on your mobile phone or data account is not unusual. We've heard of similar situations already since anything is actually vulnerable to security hacks especially if one is not careful. The latest case is that of a California woman who is filing a complaint against Google for its inadequate security. Because of security flaws, her Google Play Store account has been exploited by hackers. The result: thousands of dollars of unauthorized charges.

Bootloader unlock for Kindle Fire HDX tablet now available

The Kindle Fire HDX Tablet is just one of those tablets, you know – the ones that you love so much for the robust specs but hate so much because of the software embedded in it. In this case it is Amazon’s proprietary Fire OS. Nothing against the concept of tweaked Android stuff, because we love that. It’s just the locked bootloader on the tablet – which means you can’t easily change software – that tick us off.

Sandboxing flaw opens Gmail, apps to hijacking

Researchers at the University of California Riverside and University of Michigan have discovered a flaw in Android that could allow nefarious users to hijack apps. The researchers believe that Android isn’t alone in being vulnerable to this attack; iOS and Windows Phone are thought to be susceptible to the flaw as well.

Yo app founder confirms “security issues”

It seems most users either love, or hate the recently released Yo app. The app is touted as being the "simplest and most efficient communication tool in the world." Basically, the Yo app allows you to say yo. But more important for today are the recently confirmed security issues.
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