Google

Big surprise: Android Pay coming your way

Google has formally announced something we already knew was coming anyway. Android Pay is real and is here. Google's latest attempt to cash in, no pun intended, on the mobile wallet trend tries to learn from the reasons that Google Wallet failed. Practically, this means that it has partnered with major payment networks, banks, carriers, and retailers even before it launched, ensuring that it will not only have an audience but also somewhere that audience can use it, whether it be an online purchase or a brick and mortar buy.

Google I/O 2015: The story so far

Google covered a lot of ground at its I/O 2015 keynote this morning, and Android stood at the forefront of its efforts. Android M was revealed, which first arrives as a Developer Preview and will later arrive for the public in the third quarter of this year. Google has high as ever hopes for its mobile platform, and as such revealed the anticipated Android Pay, its bid to compete with Apple Pay and other mobile payment systems. Read on for all the details!

Brillo takes Android deeper into your homes

Even before this announcement, it was no secret that Google wants to play a bigger role inside homes, and Nest just isn't enough, with only two products on its shelf. With Brillo and the Weave protocol, however, Google can considerably expand its influence to both existing and upcoming smart appliances. Leveraging the ubiquity of Android, Brillo promises to make things simpler for OEMs, app developers, and especially users in controlling and orchestrating all those disparate pieces that together make up the so-called Internet of Things.

Android M is here: app permissions, doze mode, USB-C

Google I/O 2015 has kicked off and, no surprise, Android is front and center. Also no surprise that Google has announced the existence of Android M just as it had announced Android L at the same event a year ago. And like its predecessor, the features of Android M will slowly be revealed over time while the latest version of Android treks its way to a Q3 2015 release. For now, Google has revealed some of M's key features, which, as expected, includes App Permissions.

Enter to win a Nexus 9, Chromecast, and Google Play gift card [DEALS]

The Google Gadget Giveaway offers the chance for one lucky person to take home a new Android powered Google Nexus 9 tablet, a Chromecast stick, and a $100 Google Play gift card. It’s a formidable combination that’ll help anyone get more out of their home entertainment system. Enter to win an entertainment and productivity prize package valued at $550 with The Google Gadget Giveaway, presented by Android Community Deals.

Chevrolet adding Android Auto, CarPlay to 2016 car lineup

Chevrolet seems to be serious with digitizing cars. Why, the car manufacturer has announced the it's adding Android Auto and Apple CarPlay to fourteen cars under GM's 2016 line-up. This means the infotainment systems, even if still in their early stages, will be utilized and finally used as a common feature. While other companies charge more for such systems, Chevrolet is making the advanced smartphone connectivity a standard item.

Google signature font Roboto now an open source

Last week, Google introduced the new Literata typeface for Play Books. Companies like Google make sure that even the fonts used in their products and services are consistent as part of branding and marketing. The tech giant has been using Roboto family of fonts for many years but it's only now that Google is making it open source. The signature font was created by designer Christian Robertson and looks like it will soon have more versions now that it's an open source project.

Google to finally get serious with Virtual Reality during I/O 2015

When the Google Cardboard was given away to developers at last year's I/O conference, it was done so with very litte fanfare, and in fact, close to no instructions as to what the virtual reality device was capable of doing. This year's I/O 2015 developer's conference seems a little more keen on exploring and sharing what VR can do for apps, devices, consumers as they are offering more sessions that has to do with this new frontier, which some may consider as a "sleeping tiger".

Google analyzes answers to common security questions

Secret questions are supposed to help a person keep his privacy and his profile secure. Problem is, most secret questions are very common that it's easier for anyone to guess the answers, code, pin, or password to an account. This happens especially if there are so many information available. Questions like "What is your mother’s maiden name?" or "What was your first pet’s name?" are often asked that somehow, people can easily guess them to access your account.