Google Music

DoubleTwist adds support for Google Music and separate Alarm Clock app

DoubleTwist burst onto the Android scene as an alternative and bridge for iTunes, but now that Google sells its own tunes, they're getting with the program. The DoubleTwist app can now recognize music from the Google Play Music service and plays them back through its app alongside any of the standard MP3s or other songs you've got stored on your Android devices' internal storage or SD card. There's just one hitch: like Cloud Music Sniper, the updated app can only "see" the music you've selected for offline access in the Google Music  app.

Google Play Music to get Labs features soon

For all Google Music's charms and its drawbacks, there's still places where it could improve. According to Google Operating System, it soon will: Google Play Music is set to get a Labs function, just like a handful of other Google services like Gmail and the Android browser. You can see a placeholder section for the Labs experimental features right now, though at the moment it's empty. The folks at Google Operating System dug around the HTML and CSS code for this and other pages and got a pretty good idea of what's in store.

Google Play Music needs to increase streaming and device limits

Google's music streaming option has continued to grow over the past few months since it was officially released back in November of 2011. Originally called Google Music it was recently renamed Google Play Music along with the Google Play Store. While the average user wont run into some of the below issues, many of the die-hard Android users (and there are plenty) will have them, and hopefully Google can make some changes moving forward.

Google is still working on adding Google Play content for more countries

One of the more frustrating aspects of Android for non-US users is that a lot of the content on the Google Play Store (formerly the Android Market) isn't available in other countries. Certain apps and usually all of Google Music, Movies and Books aren't available in all territories. Users have been voicing their complaints at the Google Play Google+ page, and Google has responded. Essentially, they're trying as hard as they can, but the intricacies of international content licensing are not for the faint of heart.

Google Play will probably add audiobooks and periodicals, but not soon

More than a few have been somewhat confused by Google's Android and media rebranding efforts around the Google Play name. But it looks like it's here to stay, and if an Audiobooks portal spotted by Google Operating System is any indication, they're looking to expand. Of course audiobooks are a natural extension of both Google Book and Google Music (now Google Play Books and Google Play Music - see how that works?) but they may also be looking into magazines, catalogs, newspapers and other periodicals.

Google Music celebrates leap year with 29 albums for $2.99 each

It doesn't take much for the folks behind Google Music to throw a party. Just a couple of weeks after their romantically-themed Valentine's Day sale, they've put on a promotion so special it only comes around one year in four - lucky for us that Google Music is less than a year old. The Leap Year sale starts today, February 29th, and may or may not end today, too. Take your pick of 29 different popular albums for the low price of $2.99 each.

Cloud Music Sniper gives third-party apps access to Google Music

Google Music is pretty awesome - as an integrated service on Android, it's hard to beat. But there's just one issue with music stored on Google's servers, whether it's purchased from the Android Market or uploaded from your collection: it's only accessible from Android using the official Google Music app. With developer R2DoesInc's Cloud Music Sniper, that's no longer the case: this Market app allows any application to access locally stored songs from Google Music, so long as they've been downloaded to your phone/tablet's internal storage or SD card.

Google Home Entertainment System and Cloud Drive could be linked

We've already heard rumblings of the long-speculated Google cloud storage system coming to fruiting soon under the label "Google Drive". Now the rumor mill at WSJ is churning with news of a home entertainment service from the ubiquitous search engine provider, which may or may not be linked with the Android@Home project. It is coincidence that both of these stories have been leaked within hours of each other? Officially, yes; that's kind of the nature of a leak.  But unofficially it all points to a centralized, Google-hosted media hub that's accessible from any Android device, PC, or connected television.
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