Google Chrome OS

Google Chrome Event Announced, Invites Sent to Publishers [UPDATED]

Hooray! Invites have been sent out to publishers for an even that'll be taking place on December 7th at around 10AM centered around Google Chrome! What'll it be, what'll it be?! This event will take place at Dogpatch studios over in San Francisco, the event lasting 3 hours, with a DEMO session near the end! You know what that means? Something totally and completely sweet.

Are Google Chrome OS and Android Destined to Converge?

A lot of you probably saw this one coming, I mean, after all, what is the point of having two separate OSes for almost all the same devices. Unless Google wants to go all out with Chrome OS into computers and Android for mobile devices only. Google’s execs have agreeing that Chrome OS and the Android platform have “a great deal of commonality” and “may merge even closer.” And now Sergey Brin, one of Google’s founders, has told reporters - after last week’s Chrome OS reveal - that “Android and Chrome will likely converge over time”. Brin also said: “A subsequent version of Android is going to pick up a lot of the Chrome stack. My guess is we’ll have ‘Chrome Lite’ or something similar.” He cited among other things, the common Linux and Webkit code base present in both projects. But Google's Sundar Pichai, Vice President, Product Management, said in his presentation:
We're reaching a perfect storm of converging trends where computers are behaving more like mobile devices, and phones are behaving more like small computers. Having two open source operating systems from Google provides both users and device manufacturers with more choice and helps contribute a wealth of new code to the open source community.
That last statement from Google was in response to questions about how and when the two projects would merge. Seems like they wanted to downplay Brin's statement. What do you think, do you like the idea of merging both projects? Let us know in the comments. [Via SlashGear]

Will Chrome OS be the death of Android netbooks?

Fans of open source operating systems and haters of Microsoft were thrilled when word started coming out that some of the major computer makers were going to be offering netbooks that run Android. Among the major makers looking at Android are Acer, Dell, and HP with a few early machines from lesser known companies already showing up at trade shows with Android installed. With the announcement of the new Google Chrome OS coming soon, the Android plans for many of these computer makers have to be in question. Why would a major computer maker like Acer want to put Android on a netbook when it appears that Google will be favoring Chrome for computers?

Android and Google Chrome OS “may merge closer” in future

According to Google CEO Eric Schmidt, the company's Android mobile platform and their newly-announced Google Chrome OS have "a great deal of commonality."  In fact, according to the executive, the two OSes "may merge even closer" in the future. Speaking at a press conference this week, ostensibly to discuss the new netbook platform but which covered various points of Google's business, Schmidt and company founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page discussed the open-nature of the new platform.  While in their initial blog post about Chrome OS they indicated that it and Android would remain separate, and that "choice will drive innovation for the benefit of everyone, including Google", there now seems to be signs that the two will shift from parallel to integrated projects. The trio also discussed the nature of open-source software and how they do not envisage Chrome OS as a direct competitor to Windows.  In fact, Schmidt said, "Microsoft is welcome to put Internet Explorer on our operating system," but that "it's highly unlikely they would do it.  They would have to port it and the port is not trivial ... the ball is in their court."  Referring to Google's well-known "do no evil" pledge, he highlighted the fact that because Chrome is open-source "even if we had an evil moment [to block out Microsoft], we would be unsuccessful." The first netbooks running Google Chrome OS are expected in the second half of 2010.

Google Chrome OS hardware partners named

Hot on the heels of their Chrome OS announcement, Google have revealed a list of the technology companies they are working with to eventually produce devices running the new platform.  Tipped as a partial list, the roster nonetheless includes several names we're familiar with from Open Handset Alliance membership. Acer, Adobe, ASUS, Freescale, HP, Lenovo, Qualcomm, Texas Instruments and Toshiba are all named, though Google says these are "among others".  Notable by their absence are Sony and Dell, as are Samsung; the latter has obviously invested in Android, as it is about to launch the I7500 Galaxy, and has a well-received netbook range. The search giant has also re-confirmed that Google Chrome OS will be a free product for end-users, and made open-source later on in the year.  Actual shipping products based on the OS - which has been described as the Chrome browser sitting within a new windowing system on top of a Linux kernel - aren't expected until the second-half of 2010.

Google Chrome OS promises web-based netbook platform by late 2010

Google have announced their latest project, Google Chrome OS, an open-source platform for x86 and ARM based netbooks, notebooks and computers.  Building on their existing Chrome browser, Google Chrome OS is tipped to load and be internet-ready in seconds, be inherently secure from viruses and malware, and present no issues with hardware or software updates.  Chrome OS has at its heart a Linux kernel, with Chrome running within a new windowing system. Google Chrome OS will first appear on netbooks in the second-half of 2010, with the search giant apparently already in talks with manufacturers regarding distribution.  Prior to that, however, they will make Chrome OS open-source later on in 2009, allowing developers to get to grips with the platform. Since most of the user experience will take place on the web, with users interacting with web-apps, developers will be able to use existing coding skills to create software that not only runs on Google Chrome OS but any standards-based cross-platform browser.  As for Android, that remains a going concern for Google, with the company suggesting that "choice will drive innovation for the benefit of everyone, including Google" in the areas where the two platforms overlap.
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