developers

Jawbone app now able to link with other devices

When Jawbone fitness wristbands hit the market in 2012, you could only link them with proprietary Jawbone-created apps – which was quite understandable at any rate, as people had no problem using the app on their iPhones and Android devices. In a surprising move, Jawbone has announced that it is opening up its API to the sensors in Android, iOS, and WP 8.1 devices.

Turbo Editor gives file editing a much needed boost

When it comes to writing text, most users would run to a word processor of some sort. Power users, system administrators, programmers, and web developers¸ on the other hand, will be flocking towards more powerful plain text editors. Surprisingly, there is no lack of such apps on the more touch-oriented Android platform, and Turbo Editor from XDA Senior Member Vlad Mihalachi is one of the latest contenders in that arena.

Amazon Appstore introduces live app testing for developers

If you’re an app developer, you would always want to ensure that your product is fully tested before unleashing it into the market. Live testing is probably the best way for you to see if there are any bugs needed to be fixed or if your app is actually working properly. Amazon Appstore is now introducing Live App Testing for their developers, proof that they are indeed serious in getting through to mobile developers and the app market.

I/O 2014 app source code shows developers how it’s done

Last month, Google released its fancy new I/O 2014 app in preparation for its annual conference. Now it's announcing that the source code for the app is now available from Google's GitHub repository. While end-users might have no use for this, unless they happen to be knowledgeable about and/or like reading Java code, Google is inviting developers to take a look inside and learn about current best practices of creating an Android app and using Google's API.

Android TV ADT-1 dev kits start shipping to developers

To prepare the new Android sub-platform for its first actual launch later this year, Google has started sending the ADT-1 Android TV preview kit to would-be app developers. This will hopefully ensure that by the time Android finally makes its way to the living room, there won't be a dearth of apps, games and content that could steal the thunder from this new device category.

5 Things to Love and Hate in the Android L Dev Preview

It's been a little more than a month since Google let the cat out of the bag and gave out the developer preview of Android L for developers to test and curious but daring onlookers to try. While the preview wasn't made for end users to enjoy, it does bare a few markings of what awaits us in the next Android release. So what have we liked so far and what do we hope Google will get to fix before that expected day?

No new Android L preview images will be coming

Perhaps you are a developer eager to get the next blockbuster app or game completely ready for Android L. Or maybe you're a power user testing the waters of the next Android release. Whether or not you fall into either of these categories, if you've been waiting for an announcement for an Android L Developer Preview version 2.0, don't hold your breath. A Google developer has practically confirmed what you probably didn't want to hear: no updated images are planned for the pipeline.

Android Wear to get API for making custom watch faces

Despite having its official release and even official devices, Android Wear might still be a bit raw, untested in the wild at the very least. So it isn't surprising to learn that not everything is set in stone yet, even when it comes to the tools that developers need. The Android Wear team has just revealed that they are working on API that will make it easy for developers to create their own custom watch faces.
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