desktop

Asus packs Android and Windows 8 into Transformer hybrid

This week Asus pulled the wraps off the new device that has two different operating systems in one unit. The product is called the Asus Transformer AiO P1801 PC/tablet hybrid. The machine is set to officially launch on April 12 and is a bit of the tablet in PC hybrid.

Galaxy S III spotted in Samsung Kies

If you're an Android modder and you've had even a fleeting relationship with Samsung hardware, odds are pretty good that you've run across Kies, the company's desktop syncing and software flashing app. Kies keeps a database of all current Samsung Android devices, and you'll never guess what's just popped into it. Or maybe you will, since leaks seem to falling from the sky on this one: the Galaxy S III. Or more appropriately, the Galaxy S3, since that's what the phone is labelled in the application.

Unofficial desktop Google Music Player available for Windows

Google Music is gaining momentum, and it's a great way to access your music collection. But one thing it's missing over the likes of iTunes is a desktop component - after all, plugging in your Android phone to your desktop speakers or going to the Google Music Website isn't always an ideal solution. Thankfully, DeviantArt user Victor Alberto Gil has created a desktop interface for the service. If you're a Windows user, you can download and run it now.

DROID RAZR ICS leak includes Motorola WebTop 3.0

Well would ya look at that - Ice Cream Sandwich isn't the only thing included in the Android 4.0 ROM  fro the Motorola DROID RAZR and DROID RAZR MAXX. There also appears to be a brand-spanking new version of WebTop, the desktop-style operating system that's activated when you plug a compatible Motorola Android phone into a LapDock accessory. Stifle your yawns, Android faithful: it looks like this version isn't just a spit and polish update. No, it's more like a full tablet makeover, not unlike the shift from smartphone UI to tablet UI in the ASUS Padfone.

Android x86 adds Ethernet and VirtualBox support

There's been a lot of talk about desktop modes i Android this week, but many don't realize that you can install an experimental build of Android on your laptop or desktop computer right now. Android-x86 is a derivative of open-source Android that runs on standard Intel-compliant hardware, i.e. the vast majority of computers out there. The latest modified version from Android-Dev.ro adds two important features: Ethernet networking support (for small computers like the Atom-based "net-tops" that lack WiFi) and virtualization, so that eager users can try out Android in Virtual Box, VMware or similar programs.

New Google patent points toward Android desktop mode

Tired of hearing about Android on the desktop? Too bad. Just days after rumors started spreading about a dockable desktop mode in Android 5.0 "Jelly Bean" Patently Apple (which really needs a new name, by the way, since Apple's "spirit of invention" has devolved into copying then suing absolutely everyone) found patent filings pointing towards trackpad gestures in future versions of Android. You can take this one of two ways: that Google intends the smartphone/tablet to work as a trackpad in docked mode (as it can now) or that these features are aimed at full laptops or desktops running Android.

Ubuntu for Android gets a hands-on video

Canonical's brand-spanking new combination of Android and the Ubuntu Linux distribution is easily the most exciting software development for Android since Ice Cream Sandwich. Basically it packs an ARM-based version of Ubuntu into a standard Android phone, activating it only when docked to a computer via HDMI. The software and basic capabilities were announced earlier today, but a Canonical employee was nice enough to post a live demonstration of Ubuntu on Android to YouTube.

Canonical brings Android and Ubuntu together in perfect Unity

Yesterday we spoke briefly about a rumored feature in Android Jelly Bean that could turn any Android smartphone into a dockable desktop computer. Turns out that FOSS publisher Canonical seems to be one step ahead of El Goog: they've managed to cram both Ubuntu and Android Gingerbread onto the same hardware. In effect, it's like using two different machines in different modes: when the smartphone is in its "normal" mode, it works like any Android handset. When it's docked, you get access to the full Ubuntu interface. Based on the screenshots, you can run Android applications withing the Ubuntu interface, but probably no the other way around. You'll also be able to view the phone's screen while using Ubuntu on a monitor.
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