bootloader

Android Community Weekly : May 28, 2011

Welcome back to Android Community Weekly! Early this past Monday, details of the HTC Holiday headed for AT&T emerged. Much like the EVO 3D, it is said to sport a dual-core 1.2 GHz processor as well as a qHD display (and just like the Samsung Infuse, it is said to span 4.5”). Also launched this week was AppTap Ads to aid in advertising applications for developers. It will give users an easy to use ad buying tool to track their targeted ads across the net.

Android Community 101: Bootloaders

Bootloaders. They're quite the touchy subject for many of us geekier android lovers. Naturally they've been a hot topic in the news lately, with HTC deciding to lock down phones only to reverse the decision. This is hardly an issue reserved for HTC though. For those who aren't as privy to the underlying workings of computers, what a bootloader is, and what it means for one to be unlocked can be unclear. We're gonna break down for you what a bootloader does (at a non-technical level), what the difference between locked/encrypted/unlocked/signed/etc, which manufacturers are doing what, and why the debate is so hot, and why you should care.

Sony Ericsson Talking Bootloader Unlocking Too

SO we're talking about unlocking bootloaders lately, and it appears the Sony Ericsson is up for review next. Last night we were tipped off by HTC that they would, indeed be unlocking bootloaders on all future devices. What Sony Ericsson is doing at this very moment is discussing the bootloaders on the new Sony Ericsson Xperia PLAY, specifically in regards to SEUS, aka the Sony Ericsson Update Service. There've been two notes coming out on this subject thus far: one that says unlocking the bootloader will stop you from getting official updates, the other that says that it'll be just fine.

Breaking: HTC to unlock all bootloaders [UPDATE: Only on Future Devices]

Breaking just now it seems all the talk and discussion on Facebook and Twitter over the last few days has finally made HTC listen. People all across twitter, myself included retweeted tons of comments regarding HTC and their new policy of having locked bootloaders on their devices. Just yesterday we reported on HTC discussing plans to change this policy. Locking the bootloader has been a huge issue in the recent past for Motorola as well. They've claimed to be unlocking future devices also. Official comment below.

HTC “reviewing” locked bootloader policy after Android feedback

HTC has confirmed that it is "reviewing the issue and our policy around bootloaders" in a move that may see the company backtrack on its locked-down Android smartphones. According to the HTC Facebook page, user satisfaction "is a top priority" and - perhaps a little tongue in cheek, given how virulently some of the Android faithful have reacted - thanks users for their "willingness to share" feedback. HTC wouldn't be the first company to reverse policy on bootloader locking. Sony Ericsson impressed modders earlier this year after it confirmed it would be allowing bootloader access to certain 2011 Android models, after getting similarly strong feedback. Now, there's no guarantee that HTC will decide unlocking is in its best interest, but we know for a fact the company is aware of the bootloader cloud hanging over the HTC Sensation and how that's pushing some power-users toward Samsung's Galaxy S II.
Update on Bootloaders Thanks so much for providing feedback, we hear your concerns. Your satisfaction is a top priority for us and we're working hard to ensure you have great experiences with our phones. We're reviewing the issue and our policy around bootloaders and will provide more information soon. Thank you for your interest, support and willingness to share your feedback.
[Thanks to everyone who sent this in!]

Confirmed: HTC Sensation dump shows signed bootloader

One of the best things about the Android operating system is the hackable and open nature of the OS. You can unlock mod, change and do pretty much what you want. Comparatively, the iPhone is locked down with a constant fight between hackers and Apple to find and patch holes that allow the phones to be jailbroken. Recently, many of the big names in the Android smartphone market has been doing things like offering unlocked bootloaders for some phones.

Motorola Changing policy on locked bootloaders?

We have some possibly great news here, but I wouldn't get to excited just yet. According to some very new information it looks like Motorola will be changing their policy on locked bootloaders and will offer a solution for both end users, and unlocking for developers. Excellent! For anyone that has followed any Android news as of late, has heard about this story from one source or another. This has been a major public issue for Motorola for more than a few weeks now.

Sony Ericsson Xperia Arc Rooted already

Ever since Sony announced that they would be having unlocked bootloaders I'm sure you have all been happily waiting for the new and exciting phones they have coming out to hit the shelves. The Xperia Play, and the Arc look sweet. Today I have some news for you, looks like the Xperia Arc has already been rooted.

Sony Ericsson unlocking bootloader for some 2011 Android phones

Sony Ericsson has announced that it will be taking a more flexible approach to unlocking the bootloader on its Android smartphones, though the functionality won't be available until later in the year. According to Karl-Johan Dahlström, Senior Program Architect at Sony Ericsson, certain models of the company's 2011 range - including the XPERIA Play, Arc, Pro and Neo - will offer an open-bootloader option for flashing third-party firmware. Only SIM-unlocked versions of the handsets will be eligible for the official bootloader unlock, which Sony Ericsson says is because its carrier and other partners are cautious about files and apps being pulled from the secure storage of the devices they offer. Certain markets and configurations of handset will also be ineligible. Basically, Dahlström says, if you can connect your phone to the Fastboot tool in the Android SDK, you'll be able to unlock it. The original X10 will not be eligible. The company also cautions about the potential impact on owners' warranties, with the possibility of a "handling fee" should Sony Ericsson repair your device after it has been flashed with unofficial firmware. Still, this is good news for the Android community, which has grown used to being able to use its ROM of choice on its preferred device. More news about the functionality in the spring.

Nexus S Boots and Runs Ubuntu

Oh my goodness! How would you like your Nexus S, which recently of course booted up MeeGo, to boot you up some lovely Ubuntu? It's totally possible, and it's done by the same dude as did the MeeGo boot! XDA developer forum member, stroughtonsmith — or Steven Troughton-Smith brings us all we need to get started.
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