android games

Because We May game sale brings great indie deals

Game developers are an opinionated bunch, they're thrilled that modern distribution platforms like Steam and the Google Play Store allow them to cut out the publisher middleman. To celebrate this, an impressive conglomeration of developers has banded together to create the Because We May promotion, running from today until June 1st. Almost sixty Google Play Store games have been put on sale, all of them at least half off and some of them even more.

The birds are back in town: Angry Birds Heikki landing in June

The Angry Birds are back (from outer Space) or at least they will be come June 18th. That's the day Rovio has pegged for "Angry Birds Heikki", another themed version of the ever-popular mobile game. The birds are once again dipping into the sponsorship pool, as the title references Formula 1 race car driver Heikki Kovalainen from Finland. Rovio is based in Finland, so naturally they're expressing some national pride.

Android game developers: innovate, don’t emulate

I have a confession to make: I almost never use any of my Android devices for gaming. If I want to play video games, I either find a truck to jump-start my ancient desktop computer or turn on my even more ancient Dreamcast. The fact that I'm terrible at touchscreen controls (and I am) is only part of the problem: there just isn't enough innovation on the mobile platform for me to choose it over more traditional forms of gaming.

EA backs off: won’t disable older mobile games

EA, never the most beloved of America's gaming companies, made a major goof yesterday: they sent a message to players of the iOS version of Rock Band that the game would shut down on May 31st, flat-out denying the app to thousands of players who'd paid $4.99 for it. As you might expect, reactions were almost universally negative, including our own. EA has now recanted that particular message, saying that "Rock Band for iOS will remain live - the in-app message users received yesterday was sent in error." Sure, guys, sure - we're just glad you've seen sense.

Angry Birds Space breaks records with 50 million downloads

Angry Birds Space is popular. That statement is something akin to "rock is hard" on the scale of most obvious things ever said, but a little specificity is useful: Rovio claims that the sequel to the smash hit Angry Birds has been downloaded 50 million times since it was released last month. That makes Angry Birds Space the fastest-growing ("selling" isn't really appropriate here) mobile game of all time. The stat takes into account downloads on Android and iOS.

Project Glass Battlefield concept brings augmented reality to gaming

Project Glass has inspired its fair share of constructive conversation, not to mention parody. But the latest video to play off of Google's augmented reality project takes the cake and the checkpoint. YouTube user ThereIsACanal used the ideas presented in Google's now-famous concept video and extrapolated to see what "Battlefield 5" could look like when taken into the real world. The results aren't exactly a cinematic masterpiece, but the video does a great job at illustrating the possibilities inherent in augmented reality gaming.

Classic PC racer Death Rally gets another lap on Android

It's a good time to be an Android owner and a classic gaming fan. The latest 90s-era game to come to Android is the racing/shooting hybrid Death Rally, a Twisted Metal-style game that pits your customized war machine against other on the highway to he... er, Arkansas. The tongue-in-cheek game was released for iOS last year, but now it's available on Android for free, bupkiss and nada. Imagine it as Reckless Racing with machine guns, and you're just about there.

Fake Angry Birds Space app is a trojan in disguise

Angry Birds Space is a lot of fun. No, really, it justifies the hype - if you haven't tried it yet, download the free game in the Google Play Store. But for Pete's sake, make sure you're using the Google Play Store: a fake app is unsurprisingly masquerading as the ultra-popular mobile game to add Android phones and tablets to its network of infected devices, remotely downloading more malicious apps and displaying ads. Security researchers at Sophos spotted the fake app in third-party app stores, but says that the official Rovio files are not affected.

N64 emulator ripped off, then kicked out of the Play Store by copycat

The great thing about open source software is that anybody can use it. The not-so-great thing about open source software... is that anybody can use it. Such was the case with two N64 emulators battling it out on the Google Play Store. According to a massive Reddit thread, the original game emulator was called "Mupen64Plus Android Edition", developed by Paul Lamb and based off of the open-source emulator Mupen64Plus. Under the General Public License, anyone can use the Mupen code for any project they like (including charging for it) as long as proper attribution is given. Paul put up his app on the Google Play Store, and for a while, all was right with the world.
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