Android-Apps

AirDroid updates with easier browser access

We've mentioned AirDriod before: it's a great way to access and manage your Android phone or tablet from your computer when there isn't a USB cable handy. The free app's latest update adds a host of new features, most of which are designed to make accessing your phone from your desktop browser even easier. In addition to a permanent shortlink to web.airdroid.com, you can now scan a QR code displayed on your computer monitor instead of entering a random password.

EA backs off: won’t disable older mobile games

EA, never the most beloved of America's gaming companies, made a major goof yesterday: they sent a message to players of the iOS version of Rock Band that the game would shut down on May 31st, flat-out denying the app to thousands of players who'd paid $4.99 for it. As you might expect, reactions were almost universally negative, including our own. EA has now recanted that particular message, saying that "Rock Band for iOS will remain live - the in-app message users received yesterday was sent in error." Sure, guys, sure - we're just glad you've seen sense.

Alt Mounter brings Android USB Mass Storage back to OS X

Hands-down one of the most annoying features of the few Android phones that implement it is the MTP storage standard, which is frustrating on Windows PCs and nearly useless on Mac. Honeycomb and Ice Cream Sandwich devices (and even some Samsung Gingerbread phones) have adopted MTP over the older and generally more reliable USB Mass Storage, much to the consternation of Android users everywhere. Luckily, there's a new project on XDA that gets around it and returns sweet, sweet USB mounting to your Android device and your Mac: Alt Mounter.

Soundwire streams audio from any Windows PC to any Android

Picture this: you've set aside four or five hours to catalog your baseball card/stamp/wine bottle/My Little Pony collection, and would like some television to entertain you. Your Special Collection Sorting Table isn't anywhere near a TV - or an outlet. You'd like to catch up on ABC's Castle while you're doing it, but don't necessarily need to see the TV (Stana Katic notwithstanding) because you'll be cataloging. And you don't have Hulu Plus. Then you need SoundWire, an app that lets you stream audio - any audio - from your PC to your Android phone.

QuickOffice Pro updates with a ton of new features

Mourning the loss of Google Docs from your app tray? (Don't, by the way - all that functionality is still in Google Drive.) Looking for something with a little more oomph to edit documents on your lunchbreak? Then you'll want to check out the latest version of QuickOffice Pro. We've covered this app before, but the sheer number of additions in version 5.5 warrants attention. You can buy the standard version in the Google Play Store for $14.99, and the tablet version for $19.99.

Apple axes Chomp for Android after acquisition

We tend to ignore Apple-specific news here on Android Community, but if you're a user of app discovery service Chomp, you'll have a hard time doing that today. All references to the Android Market/Google Play Store and Verizon's V-CAST apps are gone from Chomp's website. The Chomp app itself has disappeared from the Google Play Store, and the download links on its home page go straight to iTunes. In fact you won't find any mention of the world's most popular mobile OS anywhere on their website.

Scalado Album Review

The additions to the generic Android Gallery in Ice Cream Sandwich are pretty great, but of course, they don't do much for the 90+% of user which don't have access to Android 4.0. If you're a shutterbug who wants better experience that the unfortunately slow 3D album from Android 2.3 or whatever replacement your manufacturer has provided, have a gander at Scalado Album, which goes for 99¢ in the Google Play Store. It's fast, easy to navigate, and a has a few unique features that even the ICS gallery could use.

Concept app steals keyboard taps via phone sensors

Hey, security researchers. We appreciate what you do. But the world of malware is worrisome enough without yo giving the bad guys even more ideas. A graduate student at Pennsylvania State University has upped the creepy factor by creating a concept app that can steal keylogging information by surreptitiously reading information from a smartphone's various sensors, like the accelerometer. The app is called "Taplogger", and it's just a proof of concept. For the moment.
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