Advertising

SellAring in-call advertising has users seeing red

Advertising is an unfortunately necessary part of life - and I say that as a guy whose livelihood depends upon it. But there's a fine line between an acceptable level of distraction and an infuriating invasion of a user's space. Case in point: sellAring. Instead of placing banner ads in free apps or even embedding them in the user's status bar, sellAring places audio ads (remember those, radio listeners?) over the "ring ring" sound you hear when calling another party.

T-Mobile apologizes for notification bar ads

I get the feeling that a lowly software engineer somewhere in the bowels of T-Mobile's corporate headquarters is feeling even lower tonight. After a recent update to the often mandatory T-Mobile MyAccount Android app, users started noticing periodic ads appearing in the Android notification bar. T-Mobile customers were, to put it mildly, ticked. The story hit the tech media after threads on T-Mobile's support forums and Reddit reached into the hundreds. Now T-Mobile seems to have seen the error of its ways, apologizing for the "mistake" and saying that it won't happen again.

T-Mobile angers customers with ads in Android notification bar

Here we go again: a mobile carrier is using Android's notification system to enrich its advertising options, and customers aren't happy. But this time it isn't some regional carrier on the other side of the world, it's good ol' T-Mobile, champion of urban penny pinchers and (thanks to the Google G1) a patron saint of the Church of Android. TmoNews reports that a large number of customers have taken to company and independent forums to protest the annoying and invasive ads for magenta services like the T-Mobile VIP Zone.

Peter the elephant loves the Samsung Galaxy Note – naturally

When Samsung introduced the Galaxy Note way back in September of 2011, a lot of consumers dismissed it, saying that it was just too big for their hands. Samsung seems to have found at least one customer for whom small hands are definitely not a problem. Meet Peter the elephant, the latest and certainly greatest fan of Samsung's phablet. This guy's dexterous snozz might be a little much for more standard smartphones to handle, but Peter takes to music and photo apps on the Note like nobody's business.

Ad-supported apps drain batteries quickly says study

Want to drain your smartphone's battery really quickly? Run a lot of apps. Want to drain it so fast that you'll be sprinting for the nearest outlet? Run a lot of free, ad-supported apps. This is the conclusion reached by a team of researcher from Purdue University. They found that third-party ads running in free apps downloaded from the Android Market (now the Google Play Store) could account for a whopping 65-75% of the battery drain coming from an app. That isn't to say that ads themselves are draining three-quarters of a smartphone's battery, just that the vast majority of processing power, memory and data consumption for most free apps goes towards serving ads.

Google buys the world a Coke via mobile ads

It's a happy day for children and dentists the world over. Google and Coca-Cola have partnered for a new advertising campaign that recalls the 1971 "hilltop" ad and literally buys the world a Coke. Users on Android and iOS with AdMob-served browser or app ads can click on Coca-Cola ads and send a free Coke to specially-made vending machines around the world, saving a random stranger a buck or two and making their lunchbreak. Of course ,none of this would be worth it without a little feel-good validation, so you can send a "Here's your Coke!" message to the vending machine, and receive an email or video response from your thankful recipient.

Lookout Mobile claims Android.Counterclank is adware, not malware

Last week Symantec made headlines, claiming that somewhere between 1 million and 5 million Android users had been infected with a particular kind of malware identified as Android.Counterclank. In an alarming blog post, the security software retailer notes Android.Counterclank's overly broad permissions and ability to send personal data through a network connection. Now rival security software vendor Lookout Mobile Security claims that Symantec's post was overblown, and that the code executing in the 13 apps identified is overly aggressive adware, not malware.

How much does Android earn Google? Oracle says $10M a day

Take this one with a grain of salt, folks: in a recent submission to the court in conjunction with its ongoing lawsuit, Oracle estimated that revenue from Android activations made every day net Google a whopping $10 million across an entire year. Estimating that the figure stays solid over 2012 (and keep in mind, it's almost certain to increase) that would mean that Google makes approximately 3.7 billion dollars on Android advertising alone. Oracle did not say how it reached this conclusion, but Free and Open Source Software advocate Florian Muller guesses that they're assuming $14 of ad revenue per Android user, per year.

T-Mobile pits the Amaze 4G against the iPhone 4S, Street Fighter style

It's a common enough argument: my phone is better than your phone. If you've got any friends who are particularly attached to their iPhones, you might hear it a lot. T-Mobile's out to end the debate, and they're not above using Scott Pilgrim-grade nostalgia to do it. Their latest anti-iPhone commercial pits their current flagship the HTC Amaze 4G against the iPhone 4S in a one-on-one battle to the death to the end of Round 1.
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