Advertising

Limited edition Entertainment Weekly magazine totes Android display

Who says print media is dead? Entertainment Weekly has put out a limited edition version of their magazine that features a functioning Android smartphone embedded in one of the pages, as reported by our friends at SlashGear. Let that sink in for a second; an Android device embedded in a magazine. It sounds like something out of a scifi movie. The device has a 2.3-inch screen that displays commercials for upcoming CW TV shows. Commercials cover upcoming shows such as The Arrow and Emily Owens, M.D. After a couple of ads, it links to a live version of CW’s Twitter page. That means the device is connected the Internet at all times, and upon taking the device apart, it turns out there is a T-Mobile sim card installed. As far as the insides of the device, it is appears to be a gutted ABO 810, a budget smartphone running Android 2.2 FroYo. If a user were to go and buy a similar device it would set them back around $40. The device is chargeable and can be tinkered with by more adventurous users. Clearly, this ad is working. Android Community and almost every tech site on the Internet is talking about it, which is clearly brining CW the attention the ad is seeking. Does this mean we will see more ads like this in magazines? Probably. [gallery] [via Mashable]

Twitter and Nielsen team up to offer new brand surveys

Advertising, as they say, makes the world go round. If you use Twitter frequently, you've probably seen more than few promoted tweets in your timeline, and now the company is looking to expand on that idea a little bit. Twitter has teamed up with Nielsen to deliver brand surveys to users in the same way it shows promoted tweets, allowing companies to get a better idea of how its Twitter ad campaigns are working.

Samsung Facebook campaign backfires

A lot of companies try their hardest to engage their fans on social media to try to bolster up their public image. The best way to engage people is to pose a fun and interesting question for them to answer. However, Samsung's question to its followers a couple weeks ago backfired on them pretty badly.

Nexus 7 ad graces Google’s homepage

Whoa! There's a lot of different options when it comes to advertising a big product. I'm sure several of you have seen the Nexus 7 camping commercial on your home televisions but this latest move by Google is even bigger. The search giants homepage is the starting point for millions and millions of people daily, and now is being graced with the Nexus 7 front and center.

Study: Google’s Nexus 7 camping ad more effective than Apple ads

Here's an interesting study that sure to stoke the flames of this Android vs. iOS war: analytics company Ace Metrix has determined that Google's first Nexus 7 television spot has been more warmly-received than Apple's Genius ad campaign. For those who haven't checked them out yet, Google's Nexus 7 ad centers around a father and son as they use the 7-inch tablet on a camping trip, while Apple's campaign focuses on an Apple Genius as he helps ordinary consumers realize just how great Macs are. Both have been getting a lot of airtime because of the Olympics, so there's a good chance you've already caught a glimpse of them.

Acer Iconia Tab A210 gets a charming new ad

We're still being left in the dark as to when Acer is planning to launch its new Iconia Tab A210, but this new advertisement we have posted for you after the jump seems to suggest that Acer is gearing up for launch. We got our first introduction to the Iconia Tab A210's hardware back in June, and even though it's quite similar to the Iconia Tab A200, there are a few key differences. One of those differences is the inclusion of a quad-core Tegra 3 processor, which is a significant step up for the A200's dual-core Tegra 2 CPU.

SellAring in-call advertising has users seeing red

Advertising is an unfortunately necessary part of life - and I say that as a guy whose livelihood depends upon it. But there's a fine line between an acceptable level of distraction and an infuriating invasion of a user's space. Case in point: sellAring. Instead of placing banner ads in free apps or even embedding them in the user's status bar, sellAring places audio ads (remember those, radio listeners?) over the "ring ring" sound you hear when calling another party.

T-Mobile apologizes for notification bar ads

I get the feeling that a lowly software engineer somewhere in the bowels of T-Mobile's corporate headquarters is feeling even lower tonight. After a recent update to the often mandatory T-Mobile MyAccount Android app, users started noticing periodic ads appearing in the Android notification bar. T-Mobile customers were, to put it mildly, ticked. The story hit the tech media after threads on T-Mobile's support forums and Reddit reached into the hundreds. Now T-Mobile seems to have seen the error of its ways, apologizing for the "mistake" and saying that it won't happen again.
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