T-Mobile

FCC, carriers may have come to agreement on device unlocking

The FCC and carriers may have come to an agreement on device unlocking. Reports now suggest that both carriers and the FCC have agreed, in principle, to a method for notifying customers of their rights regarding unlocking devices. This all comes after FCC chairman Tom Wheeler said he preferred to see a day when carriers weren’t so stringent about device regulations, especially once out of contract.

T-Mobile Galaxy S III LTE Android 4.3 update now live

The Galaxy S III is far from the newest device on the market, but at the same time, it isn't one that Samsung and the carriers are done with just yet. In fact, T-Mobile has just begun rolling out an update. The update is heading to those carrying the Galaxy S III LTE (t999L) and is arriving as Android 4.3 with baseband version T999LUVUBMK4. And along with the change in version numbers, there are some new features.

Verizon may be interested in trading, not selling, their A-Block 700 MHz spectrum

T-Mobile has geared up to buy Verizon’s A-Block 700MHz spectrum, recently freeing up nearly $4 billion in capital. AT&T is also said to be interested, and has as much buying power as does T-Mobile. Verizon, who agreed to relinquish the spectrum when they acquired another block, might now be selling. Reports now indicate that Verizon, who has to thin their lower frequency spectrum portfolio, might be interested in a trade.

T-Mobile Galaxy Note II Android 4.3 rollout now underway

T-Mobile has yet to formally announce, however according to some users reports, it looks as if they have begun rolling out an update for the Samsung Galaxy Note II. The update is coming over-the-air and arriving as Android 4.3 Jelly Bean with baseband version T889UVUCMK7. Perhaps the key here, this update means T-Mobile Galaxy Note II users will be able to leave behind Android 4.1, which originally arrived back in June as v4.1.2.

US police revealed to have spent millions to buy cell phone records from carriers

Here is yet another case pointing to the government's overarching police power and how far, or how much, it is willing to go to gather intelligence about its citizens. US Senator Edward Markey has disclosed that, based on figures coming from major US carriers themselves, law enforcers have spent more than $26 million last year to buy information from these telecommunications companies.