T-Mobile retail traffic up following UNcarrier announcement

April 9, 2013
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While the long term effects have yet to be seen, T-Mobile seems to have attracted a fair bit of attention following their recent UNcarrier announcement. This event happened a short while back and basically, saw the carrier move away from the standard two-year agreement pricing structure. The interesting part here, it seems foot traffic in T-Mobile retail stores has been on the rise.

We haven't seen any specifics released by T-Mobile, however we heard talk coming from both Andrew Sherrard who is the senior vice president of marketing as well as David Carey who is the executive vice president for corporate services. In short, both are talking about the increase in retail store visitors with Carey noting that he feels there is "every reason to believe this momentum will continue and carry forward."

On the flip side though, while he talked of increased visitors, he did acknowledge that it was a bit early to get any indication of traction from customers. Following through on Carey believing they are doing something good, he cited the recent campaign from Virgin Mobile. You remember, the one where they are giving a $100 credit to those who switch from T-Mobile.

Carey had said that "they're doing it because we're doing something good," and then went on to say that "they wouldn't respond if we weren't doing something right." Time will tell just how this all plays out for T-Mobile, but in the meantime, there is still other T-Mobile related bits to follow -- for one, the still pending merger with MetroPCS.

[via CNET]


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  • http://twitter.com/PhoR11 Bradley Baustert

    Most people aren’t going to pay the ludicrous fees to get out of their contracts even if they’re interested in the new plan structure at T-Mobile, so a small increase in traffic this soon should correspond with a pretty large amount of consumer interest.

    I’m just hoping that T-mo does well with this new structure so that the industry starts moving away from contracts and “always-on” subsidies.