Nexus 7 beats iPad mini and old Nexus in durability tests

August 8, 2013
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It looks like Google has a winner with the new Nexus 7. A growing trend with each new smartphone and tablet as of late is the infamous drop test. Where someone tosses a few phones on the ground at different angles to see how it handles the situation, and if it can withstand an average users drop onto concrete. Well, Square Trade is testing the new Nexus 7 in a drop, slide, and water dunk test vs the competition in a new video.

We've seen a lot of these drop tests, and they usually don't appear to be very fair or accurate. Whatever machine Square Trade is using here appears to give them all the best chance to drop in the exact same fashion. Since most users always complain drop tests aren't very accurate. Then this protection plan company goes further and slides the devices, and even dunks them in water.

We know you've been there before. Walking along and accidentally drop your phone or tablet from waist or chest height right onto the pavement or sidewalk. It's a depressing feeling to hope the screen isn't shattered. Well, it looks like the new Nexus 7 from ASUS and Google performs better than the original, and the competitors iPad mini in all three of these tests.

According to Square Trade all of the devices took a little damage from the drop, as you saw in the video, however the new Nexus 7 was the only tablet that held up to the drop and didn't have a cracked screen. The slide test isn't that big of a deal, but we could see that iPad mini flying off a table on accident.

Then of course the water dunk test, which we'd advise against ever trying at home. This test shows all three devices dunked into water like a child might do in the tub. The old Nexus 7 ends up rebooting, and I'm guessing died later. The iPad mini lost all audio capabilities, and the new Nexus 7 manages to keep on trucking and playing YouTube with ease. So why are they doing this? Square Trade offers a warranty for any and all circumstances for your electronics. That, and they enjoy breaking things.

VIA: ComputerWorld


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