NameTag is a facial recognition app for Google Glass with good intentions

December 19, 2013
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Have you ever met someone, and just wanted to know more about them? Google Glass owners may get the chance to satisfy their curiosity with NameTag. The new Glassware brings facial recognition to the forefront, and can give you information about someone you meet via the almighty cloud.


It’s pretty simple: NameTag uses your Glass camera to capture an image, then cross references it against social media or online dating sites. You can even get information about criminal history via public records. The app will also find information from photos, so if you have a photo of someone you just can’t place, NameTag can help you out.

NameTag is currently working with sites like PlentyOfFish and OkCupid, as well as Match, to show pics of those you meet or find elsewhere. You can also get their Facebook account, opening up the information stream in a way we’ve never realized before. If you’re concerned with your privacy, there are ways to remain quiet. NameTag’s creator, Kevin Alan Tussy, explains it this way:

People will soon be able to login to www.NameTag.ws and choose whether or not they want their name and information displayed to others. It’s not about invading anyone’s privacy; it’s about connecting people that want to be connected. We will even allow users to have one profile that is seen during business hours and another that is only seen in social situations. NameTag can make the big, anonymous world we live in as friendly as a small town.

The app is set to launch in Q1 2014, but doesn’t have a clear path to success. Google has noted that facial recognition will not be supported for Glass, but the team behind NameTag thinks that their altruistic goal of connecting people will sway Google. Tussy went on to ask “Now, the question isn’t if we will support Glass; it’s will Google support us?” Good question, Kevin. Good question.



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  • robert

    google will never support your invasion of privacy

    • Tom

      Google respects privacy?