Google Glass app to recognize friends using motion and clothing

March 8, 2013
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We saw some Google Glass information released directly from the source back in February. It was the Google created video that offered a look at 'How it Feels (through Glass)' and since then it seems the Glass related talk has accelerated. Since that point we have seen bits about Google Glass getting some style as well as a mock-up coming from Jet Blue and a parody coming by way of Amazon. As of today we have a bit more to think about in terms of Glass.

This latest is coming by way of Duke University, who are apparently working on an app that will allow the glasses to recognize a person without using facial recognition. Coming from the published paper, it was said that they want to complement facial recognition. The paper acknowledges the use of facial recognition, however notes that "it may not always be possible to see a person's face." Based on that they plan to use other points including the "color of clothes, decorations, and even human motion patterns."

Putting this all together and we have what they are calling a "fingerprint." The system itself is called InSight and while not perfect just yet, it was said that it becomes "feasible to recognize individuals with reasonable consistency." The before side of this does take a bit of work though, it was noted that your 'friends' would need to submit some pictures of themselves ahead of time. Based on these images, and the data that is extracted from them -- that person would then get a profile for easier recognition.

While this seems interesting, it does appear to be something that we are going to have to see to really understand the full benefit of. One possible perk here, as compared to using facial recognition is that this seems to take some prep work, sort of making it an opt-in system. Basically, that seems like it should help to ease the minds of those concerned mainly with privacy.

[via Engadget]


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  • Xavier Spruill

    People cry out, privacy! Privacy! Then go on their Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Foursquare, and tell the world every shred of identifiable information about themselves online, including what they had for breakfast. Someone can use their “InSight” and link it to the www, and have it recognize any and everyone at a moments notice. And see a heads up display about all their activities and behavioral patterns in HD. All before you have to say, Hi, my name is…

    • GS4_black_for_me

      Google Glass is amazing.^^
      Smartissimo!
      100% true.

      But pathetic Microsoft-Apple uses Google’s openness against Google.

      1) All COMPANIES, smartphones/tablets, browsers, OSystems, devices, sync features, sharing buttons COLLECT OUR INFORMATION, store it and use it for different purposes.

      2) All COMPANIES, smartphones/tablets, browsers, OSystems, devices, sync features, sharing buttons can LEAK OUR information and passwords on websites, in apps, via breach and hacks.

      3) All COMPANIES, smartphones/tablets, browsers, OSystems, devices, sync features, sharing buttons are vulnerable for web attacks, online malicious code & malware and thiefs.

      Blackberry has ceritfication and is RELATIVELY safe.
      SAMSUNG’s SAFE is safe enough.
      That’s all.

  • http://www.facebook.com/robert.john.hebert Robert John Hebert

    Is there any information about Google Glass making provisions for prescription lenses and accommodations for imperfect eyesight?

    • Alan

      I think the whole topic of google glass and focus, really interesting.
      How good IS the human eye is at focusing 1 inch in front of the eye.? We’ve only really seen footage of the camera, and little on what the projector is actually going to show.

      I don’t know about the rest of you but I can’t see anything of detail that is 1 inch from my eyes, with or without my prescription lens. I could see vague shapes and colors perhaps, but I personally can’t focus on small fonts closer than 4 inches from my eyes.

      I think at some point there could be an add-on device that you could attach to the side of your prescription glasses, i(n various colors) that would work.

      • Jonathan Alumbaugh

        In a demo by a guy from the Verge, it was implied that you’d be able to throw one of these on your pre-existing sets of glasses. Not sure about the other issues you brought up there though…