CyanogenMod weekly recap touches on Heartbleed bug, new supported devices, and themes

April 14, 2014
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Last week was almost uneventful, though it was punctuated by certain security concerns and somewhat political issues. However, it was business as usual over at CyanogenMod and now the developer team is sharing what they've been up to for the past days.

The so-called Heartbleed OpenSSL bug made headlines for the past weeks because of its far-reaching coverage and implications. Luckily for a lot of CyanogenMod owners, they don't need to worry too much. Google revealed that only Android version 4.1.1 and earlier are affected, though that may still represent a significant amount of users. Translating to CyanogenMod releases, those running on nightly builds with versions earlier than CM 10.0 should consider updating as soon as possible. Of course, the immunity to the bug only applies to the core of Android itself. Apps and services might still be affected by it.

CyanogenMod is also announcing, or rather pre-announcing, support for some devices. The HTC One mini has just joined the fold with its first nightly builds kicking off. The builds for this device are marked as m4. Given the newness of the HTC One M8, there are still no builds for HTC's 2014 flagship but maintainers have already stepped up to the challenge to fix that situation soon. The OMAP-based Amazon tablets, specifically the Kindle Fire HD 8.9 or "jem" and the Kindle Fire HD 7 or "tate" are also almost ready to have their nightly builds started. Code has been merged into GitHub and is just waiting for one minor change before things can get going.

Last, but definitely not the least, the developers will soon be ready to launch a public alpha of a new and improved Theme Engine, revealing the fruits of months of work by Cyanogen, Inc.'s own engineers, as well as contributions from Sony and T-Mobile. The new engine boasts of features such as simpler theme creation, system-level icon packs, font packs, changeable boot animations, and more. The team hasn't revealed yet when this public testing phase will begin but has already reached out to themers to give them a head start in providing users themes to play around with once that period starts.

SOURCE: CyanogenMod


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  • pmains

    It’s not necessarily true that 4.1.2+ is safe. At least with T-Mobile devices (and probably for other carriers as well), you can have OpenSSL 1.0.1a-1.0.1e installed, rather than OpenSSL version 1.0.1f+. According to Lookout Security, this means that your device is still vulnerable. If your provider does not have an update for you, the thing to do may be to install Cyanogen or some other Android mod. CM11 is the Cyanogen version of KitKat.

    • gerard

      4.1.2+ Was compiled with heartbeat disabled…