Apple continues to dominate for smartphone customer satisfaction

March 21, 2013
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The latest J.D. Power & Associates customer satisfaction report has been posted and it is similar to many of the past reports in that one thing has remained the same. The bit that has remained the same is something that Android loyalists may not be all that happy about, but here goes -- for the ninth consecutive time, Apple has remained in the top position in terms of smartphone customer satisfaction.

Not to mention, this report has Apple sitting well above the study average. The overall rankings for customer smartphone satisfaction have Apple with 855. The study average, for those wondering, is 796. That means Apple is sitting nearly 60 points higher than the average. Or more specifically, Apple is sitting exactly 60 points higher than Nokia, who is sitting in second.

Yes, that means not an Android device in the top two. Samsung does jump in at third with a score of 793. Taking a step back for a moment, lets take a look at what goes into these rankings. The key factors include performance, physical design, features and ease of operation. Anyway, rounding out the top five is Motorola and HTC with 792 and 790 respectively.

In addition to the overall rankings, the J.D Power & Associates report also reveals interesting tidbits such as how 17 percent of smartphone users report experiencing a software or device malfunction. It also appears as if social is a big part of the smartphone experience. The report notes that average smartphone users spend 115 minutes per week using social apps.

[via SlashGear]


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  • http://jimeagle.com James Eagle

    Too many cheap crap Android phones floating around from years ago.

    • Andy_in_Indy

      Also some apps do not play well with others. Pandora is known to interfere with other apps using Bluetooth data (i.e. Torque). App crashes and restarts with unknown reasons are usually perceived as a device malfunction, and the app that does not work right is not always the “bad” one.

  • Lukas Frimer Tholander

    Like you can compare that. People can’t expect the same experience for a 2 year old HTC phone for $200 as you can from a new iPhone for $1000.