Android fans are twice as likely to get malware today as they were six months ago

August 3, 2011
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The number of malware apps for the Android smartphone and tablet users to contend with is growing all the time. Some of the malware seeks to make money charging for bogus services and some wants to do other things like record your calls. CNET reports that a new report from Lookout shows that Android users are twice as likely to run across malware today compared to six months ago. The figures are based on detection rates from Lookout users on Android.

Lookout provides free and paid Android security apps to protect users. Lookout estimates that 500,000 people were affected by Android malware in the first half of 2011. The most common malware threats for Android users include DroidDream and GGTracker. DroidDream was inside over 80 apps with different version of the malware.

GGTracker is thought to be the first malware that actually steals money from users. It steals the money by signing the user up for premium text services at $10 per service up to as much as $50 per service. The report also outlines a type of attack most probably never suspect. The user can download a legitimate app that does nothing to start with. When the app is automatically, updated malware is added that compromises the device.

[via CNET]


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  • Anonymous

    Not really something you’d want creeping up in your smartphone.  Imagine if a piece of malware was created that activated front/back video cameras as well as microphones to transmit stuff ‘somewhere’.

    Something famous or high profile people, as well as the rest of us, will keep in mind when choosing a device.  It’s possible in any smartphone, but I’d say Apple has the best handle on this.

  • Anonymous

    Not really something you’d want creeping up in your smartphone.  Imagine if a piece of malware was created that activated front/back video cameras as well as microphones to transmit stuff ‘somewhere’.

    Something famous or high profile people, as well as the rest of us, will keep in mind when choosing a device.  It’s possible in any smartphone, but I’d say Apple has the best handle on this.

    • Asdf

      Going to have to call bs on this. Whoever wrote the cnet article is either biased or never bothered using android.

      The app can be updated to include functions like texting automatically? right, I guess the manual updates for some of my apps are automatically updating themselves as we speak.

    • Asdf

      Incidentally, you should look up storm8 stealing information before you think big red is perfect. Think about it, they let a tetheRing flashlight through. At least android has permission screen to let the user have a fighting chance in preventing unwanted things.

      Incidentally, that’s a nice graph, but there are currently 0 of these apps of these apps on the market, so it’a not even remotely close to “twice as likely”… Tho, I guess 0 times 2 is 0, so it’s really “twice”

  • Anonymous

    great article

    • Anonymous

      stop spamming!!!