Android 4.1.2 Jelly Bean comes available for the Nook HD+ by way of N2A Cards

December 17, 2012
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There have been some ROMs based off of CyanogenMod that will get Jelly Bean on your Nook HD+, however we suspect not everyone is going to want to go that route. If that happens to be the case for you, there is now another option to consider. That being said though, this latest option, which comes by way of N2A Cards does have one point that may turn some away.

Lets get into that one point straight away -- this is not free. It is relatively low priced though. Plus, the option from N2A cards is about the safest way we can imagine. You see, while these cards will allow you to run Jelly Bean on your Nook HD+, you are actually running the software off of a memory card.

This support just recently came available for the Nook HD+ and remains available for the Nook Tablet and the Nook Color. This Jelly Bean option is available from $19.99 if you are going with a download only option. In other words, if you are able to provide your own SD card. Those not willing, or able to get Jelly Bean on an SD card can also purchase a card with this all set.

The cards are priced from $29.99 and increase based on storage. The cards come with storage options ranging from 4GB up to 56GB. The 56GB option will set you back $89.99. On the low end, the 4GB option is $29.99. And just to clarify, the card that you will be buying is a SanDisk Class 4 microSD card with Android 4.1.2 including access to the Google Play Store.

Otherwise, for those wondering why anyone would want to buy one of these cards as opposed to using another option such as Cyanogen. Well, a few good reasons -- these N2A Cards will not void your warranty and they will also allow you to easily go back to what you had before. Simply put, these N2A Cards allow you to dual-boot between the default Nook set-up and Android Jelly Bean.

[device id=3625]

[via CNET]


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  • cwlidz

    I have this for my Nook Tablet and, although there is a bug that requires me to launch it when connected to a power source (otherwise the standard B&N operating system comes up), in general this has proved very good